pull switch on light?


  #1  
Old 04-18-03, 08:50 AM
bobz
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pull switch on light?

I would like to install a pull switch on a ceiling fixture in my basement and what I tried blew out. I bought a three lamp ceiling mount fixture that will take three 75 watt bulbs. I drilled a hole in the housing and wired a pull chain switch to it but when I tried to turn off the switch it blew out and destroyed the switch.
The guy at Home Depot said it would work, but apparently he did not really know.
The light works if wired without the switch and even worked with the switch installed and turned on.
Any advice will be appreciated!
Bobz
 
  #2  
Old 04-18-03, 09:31 AM
hotarc
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I drilled a hole in the housing and wired a pull chain switch to it
Switch loop issue aside, isn't this a code violation? By modifying the fixture, you are invalidating the UL listing of the product. I know this is a stretch, but what happens if the fixture malfunctions and starts a fire that damages your house? If the insurance company determines the fixture you modified was the cause they might be reluctant to pay any out any claims. I am not saying what you are trying to do is extremely dangerous, just want to give you a different perspective on it and something to think about.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-03, 09:42 AM
bobz
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Thanks! The line is new and is two wire romex w/ground. The light fixture has three black and three white. I did connect all three black to source black and switch black, same with white.
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-03, 09:51 AM
bobz
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Hotarc,
thank you for the warning. I only did it this way because it makes it easier for my wife to reach the switch, she's short. If it's really a hazard I'll do something else.
I have a little light tester that lights if there is power at a point.
Bobz
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-03, 10:24 AM
texsparky
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First make sure that the switch is rated high enough for (3) 75 watt lamps.

3 x 75 =225 watts = 225 watts divided by 120volts = 1.875 amps

Then make sure the fixture is rated for 75 watt lamps ( most are 60 watt rated )

Now connect the black wire from one side of the switch to the black from the incoming cable. Connect the other black wire from switch to the 3 black wires from the lamp sockets.
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-03, 10:46 AM
bobz
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Thank you. I have a choice on hand of two switches.
One switch reads 3A-125V,1A-250V,1A-125VT and another reads
6Amp 125VAC/CA, 3Amp 250VAC/A, 3 Amp 125 VL.
Also, what do I do with the three white wires, cap or tape separately or together?
Also, the wiring info on the switch pkg says top wire goes to 'load' and bottom to 'line'. What do they mean? Does load mean 'hot' (black) and line mean 'white'( neutral)?
Sorry to be so useless!

Bobz
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-03, 10:57 AM
lestrician
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This was apparently the problem you had to begin with. When wiring a switch, only the "hot leg" is switched. The neutral should be tied into the fixture with the whites, then the 12-2 that goes to the switch should be wired incoming black (hot) to white wire (mark this white wire with black marker) that white wire should be marked black at the switch also, and tied into the line side of the switch, the black wire from the switch will be wired to the load side at the switch, then to the black wires of the fixture.

When you wired the neutral and hot at the switch together, that created a dead short.... poof!
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-03, 11:12 AM
bobz
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Thanks Lestrician, but that was a bit confusing since I'm not up on some terminology.
I have a black and white 14/2 from box, I have three whites and three blacks from fixture and I have a hot (load?) and neutral (line?) on the switch.
Will you address them again to clarify for me?
Thank you, I really appreciate all this volunteer help!
Bobz
 
  #9  
Old 04-18-03, 11:18 AM
texsparky
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From what I make of your posts..........

You only have one type NM ( romex ) cable at the fixture which is a constant hot.
If this is correct, the black from this cable will connect to the line side of your switch. The white from this cable will connect to the 3 white wires from your fixture sockets. The load side of the switch will connect to the 3 black wires from the fixture sockets.

The heavier duty switch ( 6 amp 125 volt/ac ) will last longer.
 
  #10  
Old 04-18-03, 12:25 PM
bobz
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Thanks. I did it and it worked fine for a test. Then I attached he fixture to the ceilung and it failed. I reconnected all the wires and it still didn't work, so I took out the switch and wired the fixture directly and it works, so I guess the switch blew again.
Now what???
Bobz
 
  #11  
Old 04-18-03, 12:30 PM
bobz
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Just in case this is a factor... the box for the fixture says it uses 3-75 Watt R-30 Medium base bulbs. Are the regular bulbs? I have put in 3 60 Watt regular light bulbs. I never saw the term R-30 Medium Base before.
Bobz
 
  #12  
Old 04-18-03, 02:22 PM
texsparky
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R-30 is a flood type bulb whereas A19 is a standard lamp
 
  #13  
Old 04-18-03, 03:32 PM
bobz
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Thanks Tex,
I feel really dumb and it is justified!
Could that be the reason for the latest blown switch or is it unlikely that the switch would blow in less than a minute due to the wrong bulbs being installed?
Maybe I should give it up and put in a regular toggle switch on the ceiling and get my wife a stick to use to reach it.
Bobz
 
  #14  
Old 04-18-03, 04:36 PM
J
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Why don't you just install a wall switch. All the materials you need will probably cost less than $5, it will work more easily and more reliably and more conveniently than a pull chain, and it won't involve any suspect and potentially dangerous modifications to the fixture. Best of all, it's certain to work perfectly.
 
  #15  
Old 04-19-03, 07:39 AM
bobz
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Thanks to you all!

Thanks John, I think that I'll do just that. This board has been very helpful and the links referred to have been also.
Mostly, I learned to plan better than I did this time, and I am embarrassed at my ignorance.
Thanks again to all the responders.
Bobz
 
  #16  
Old 04-19-03, 01:36 PM
bobz
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Resolved

Just to follow up, the job is done and works fine. I gave up on the pull switch and put a toggle switch on the ceiling near the light (which is used only on few occasions).
All done!
Thanks again.
Bobz
 
  #17  
Old 04-19-03, 07:20 PM
doni49
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Re: Resolved

Originally posted by bobz
Just to follow up, the job is done and works fine. I gave up on the pull switch and put a toggle switch on the ceiling near the light (which is used only on few occasions).
All done!
Thanks again.
Bobz
OK, I'm curious--why would you put a toggle switch on the ceiling when you said the reason you were doing this was because your wife was short. If she can reach the ceiling, why wouldn't she be able to reach the fixture which would surely be lower (unless we're talking about a sloped ceiling like maybe an attic ceiling).
 
  #18  
Old 04-20-03, 07:11 AM
bobz
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The fixture has no switch on it. She'll have to use a stick to reach the switch, but in the end it seemed safer and actually works.
Bobz
 
 

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