What is the best height to run wires through studes

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  #1  
Old 05-07-03, 08:48 AM
PG_Parish
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What is the best height to run wires through studes

I know some things in wiring are preferences but just wanted to know some other electricians preferences.
What is the best or standard height to run wires around a room through the 2x4 studs of the wall? This would be for wiring in the room itself. How about in a room when there is also plumbing running through the wall horizontally.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 09:06 AM
johnnyd2
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my DIY method specifies a hieght that makes it relatively easy to drill (I'm 6'1") , minimizes the amount of wire needed to come down to recepticles and switches, allows for a nice bend to staple within 8" of boxes, avoids plumbing, and passes rough-in inspection (I passed) Wire is cheap...your knees, elbows, back, and time are expensive.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 10:14 AM
texsparky
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I drill at about hip level. It makes it alot easier on a bad back, and if you hit a knot or a nail, you can use your hip to help feed the auger bit through. I use a Milwaukee 1/2 " angle drill (Hole Hawg ) with a 1" auger bit for most things resi. (larger sizes as neccessary.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 02:03 PM
C
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For those of us who don't want to spend $200 to $300 for an angle drill that we probably won't use much after we're finished with our wiring projects, do right-angle attachments for a regular drill work okay? (Or are they a waste of money)
 
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Old 05-07-03, 02:14 PM
johnnyd2
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I use a Makita 9.6 cordless with a 3/4" - 7/8" spade bit (the good ones from Vermont American) and am able to drill fine in 16" stud spacing. Hooking up the spade bit with an extension sometimes helps for the narrower stud spacing at the end of a wall etc.

Mind, if I had to do this all day long every day for a living, I'd spring for the angle drill with auger bit, but I think I could drill all the holes to wire a small house with my set-up in less than a day if I had two good batteries with one always charging, and maybe a standard corded drill for the tough stuff.

Try it with the equipment you already have (but get the good bits), and see how it works.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 08:28 PM
J
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Keep the wire low. They'll be less chance of hitting it later when hanging something on the wall. If you drill all the holes at the same height (say 26"), and you remember what that height is, you can try to avoid putting in new screws at that height.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 09:52 PM
M
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A 9.6v cordless will take you a long time, not to mention the wear and tear on your drill (if it makes it through at all). Go to a rental place and rent a hole hawg for a day, it'll cost you about $20, and your cordless will thank you. Then buy a cheap 18" long 7/8" diameter auger bit and go to town.
 
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Old 05-07-03, 11:06 PM
P Michael
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I would stay away from the Hole-Hawg. This is a very dangerous tool. It has a tremendous amount of torque - Tim Allen would luv it - but that is whatmakes it so dangerous. If the bit hits a knot or a nail, the bit will stop turning but then the Hawg will start rotating and it's got 1/3 horsepower or something and you can't stop it [unless you're as strong as a horse].
Use a convention corded drill.
~Peter
 
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Old 05-08-03, 08:06 AM
M
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If you use the hole hawg according to its directions, its a perfectly safe tool.
 
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Old 05-08-03, 01:37 PM
T
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Mark the studs.

Use a black marker and extend your arm straight down (should be below hip level) and walk along the walls and mark the front of the studs (would be close to height John mentioned). Stay away from the plumbing as much as possible.
 
  #11  
Old 05-08-03, 10:11 PM
P Michael
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marcerrin,
I have personally been whapped twice in the face by the HoleHawg and would not consider it to be "perfectly safe". It is standard practice to immediately throw away the instructions which come with any new tool -- or they are SAFELY locked away in somebody's desk drawer.
The thing does not have a clutch or any other form of protection should the bit get jammed or if it hits a nail. Do the instructions warn about this?
I have heard of one worker who got killed. He was working on a new skyscraper, the bit jammed, the drill spun him and he went flying over the edge. I would not consider this "perfectly safe". [Note: I cannot verify this story but it does seem plausible.]
Perhaps this type of accident has not happened to you. Yet.
In any event, I would advise against its use on a ladder.
~Peter
 
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Old 05-08-03, 11:24 PM
M
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Milwakee Hole Hawgs come with a black steel bar, that screws in the side, (most guys either lose this bar,never bring it out of the case, or dont know what its for.) This bar comes with the drill, and has a purpose. When your drilling with a hole hawg, the black bar needs to be wedged against a sturdy structure to ensure that it doesnt "throw" the operator.
I've seen bad stuff happen to people when using hole hawgs, but never when it was used properly. Ive had the occasional finger smash when one binds up, but that was most likely user error as well. As far as throwing someone from a bulding, I could see it happening, but would ask why that person wasnt tied off with a harness if working on a skyscraper.
Over the past few years the term "hole hawg" has been what we call pretty much every drill we have, I refer to my DeWalt 1/2" as a hole hawg sometimes too, and thats what I meant in my previous post. I didnt mean to specifically refer the poster to rent an actual Milwaukee product, just a 1/2" right angle drill.
Would I call it "very dangerous", yes, if you dont know how to use it.
 
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Old 05-09-03, 02:19 PM
txsparky
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Would I call it "very dangerous", yes, if you dont know how to use it.
That statement could apply to every tool you own!
 
  #14  
Old 05-09-03, 03:27 PM
M
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My point exactly.
 
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