Shock


  #1  
Old 05-26-03, 01:02 PM
canada mike
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Angry Shock

Whenever I use my Shopvac (13 gallons), it gets electrically charged and I get zapped everytime I come to pick it up or move it. I have had this unit for about 10 years and this has started this year.

What do I do?
 
  #2  
Old 05-26-03, 01:06 PM
S
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Is it an all plastic unit or metal?
 
  #3  
Old 05-26-03, 01:23 PM
canada mike
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All plastic.
 
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Old 05-26-03, 02:54 PM
G
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You said it only started to happen this year. Did you move within this time period? Did the cord get damaged and a new one installed? Did you break the ground prong on the cord somehow? Was there any changes in the places this shop vac was being used?
 
  #5  
Old 05-26-03, 05:18 PM
J
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I have the same problem with mine. It is static build up from the particles in flowing though the plastic tubes. Did you recently replace the pickup hoses with plastic ones?
 
  #6  
Old 05-27-03, 04:48 AM
canada mike
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Nothing replaced or broken (that I can see).

I did move last year (100 km). I am trying to remember if the discharge coincides with the move but I beleive that it was ok in the beggining and started discharging recently.

The work environnement is pretty much the same (unfinished basement). The house ground is different since now my ground is a steel rod in the ground vs attached to the city water main where I was before. Could it be that the electrial ground to the house has changed? How do I know?
 
  #7  
Old 05-27-03, 06:23 AM
texsparky
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First I would make sure that the ground wire on the vacuum is still connected. You can verify this with a continuity tester. Next , I would verify that the outlets in the basement are actually grounded.
 
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Old 05-27-03, 09:05 AM
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Is the shock that you are referring to from the line voltage, or static discharge?
 
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Old 05-27-03, 09:07 AM
canada mike
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Staic discharge.
 
  #10  
Old 05-27-03, 10:13 AM
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I believe that all of the previous replys have been assuming that your shocking problem was from line voltage. Since it is static shock, I'll through my .02 in. I have the same problem as you, and I frequently receive a resounding 'snap!' with a jolt when I touch a grounded object after using the vacuum a bit. The problem is exacerbated in dry weather with low humidity - usually in the winter. In the spring & summer in my area (Alabama) the humidity is much higher and static electricity is not a problem. About all I can suggest is that you keep a free hand on a large metal mass (table saw, jointer, freezer, refrigerator, etc.) as you vacuum. This will dissipate the electrons as you go along, not allowing it to accumulate with an uncomfortable shock.
 
  #11  
Old 05-27-03, 12:30 PM
canada mike
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Thiggy,

What you are suggesting is that I act as a ground for dissipating the static that was built up. That is real nice but isin't that what the ground is for? Ground for the line voltage or ground for static is ground !???

What about when the shopvac is attached to a tool (planer, jointer, etc...). When I come to move it, or empty it, I get zapped.

The thing that bothers me the most is that I have been wordworking for a close to decade with this shopvac and only started getting zapped recently. What changed?
 
  #12  
Old 05-27-03, 12:58 PM
G
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Many things might of changed without your even realizing it. The humidity factor around your shop might be different. The weather certainly has changed a lot over the past couple of years. Another thing could be the floor covering where your using it along with the type of shoes you are using, all these things can come into play when static is involved. You said you did move and that could be a factor (dryer area or different paint on the concrete floor etc)

You could try and ground yourself first before touching the vac, or you could try and clean the vac too much dust can be a big problem. A trick I have used in the past to overcome static (don't laugh it works) is to wrap a piece of bounce around the handle.

Check the grounds on the vac itself though and make sure it is properly grounded, at the same time it would not hurt to check the receptacles you are using to make sure they have good grounds.
 
  #13  
Old 05-27-03, 03:42 PM
SLexus
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Red face This problem remind me

Back in 1978, while I lived in Minnesota; in the winter time, whenever my girlfriend came back from work we greet each other by a sparkling kiss. No Joke!! you can see the spark, like a 15Kilo Vol. spark accross an automobile spark plug. I guess because we both walked on carpet that caused static build up and discharged by a kiss.

We don't know how to solve this problem but it going away on the summer time.

 
  #14  
Old 05-29-03, 02:43 AM
lestrician
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A humidifier would probably take care of the problem
 
 

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