Adding an outdoor electrical switch

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  #1  
Old 06-09-03, 10:58 AM
shalls
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Adding an outdoor electrical switch

I need to add an outdoor electrical switch to control a new water feature. I would like to add the switch next to an in-line existing outdoor outlet. I will be running conduit up to the switch. My question is how to wire this. Any suggestions?
 
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Old 06-09-03, 12:46 PM
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You said that you'll be running conduit up to the switch. But from where? And does "next to" mean in the same box, or merely nearby? Finally, is the receptacle a GFCI receptacle, or a regular one?

This switch is wired the same as any other switch. If you are taking power from the receptacle, and if the receptacle is in a different box, then simply run a new cable from the receptacle to the switch, and from the switch to the pump. If the receptacle is in the same box as the switch, then you can use pigtails instead of a cable between them.

Connect the black and white of your new cable to the gold and silver screws of your receptacle. If the receptacle if GFCI, use the "load" screws.

At the switch, connect the two black wires to the switch, and the two white wires to each other.

Of course, interconnect grounding wires and screws in each box.

If you don't already have a couple of books on home wiring, pick a few up and read them before starting.
 
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Old 06-09-03, 12:59 PM
shalls
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I will be adding a switch next to the outdoor recep. It is a GFCI recep. The outlet that I am tapping into is an in-line recep. Is the wiring any different here? There are the (2)black wires and the (2) white wires both connected to the outlet along with the grounds. How do I tap into this? Do I just run pig tails to the new connection?
 
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Old 06-09-03, 04:05 PM
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So, does "next to" mean in the same box, or merely nearby?

So what do you mean by "in-line"? Are there already wires connected to both the "line" and "load" screws?
 
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Old 06-10-03, 11:05 AM
shalls
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the switch will be nearby the exterior outlet. I have mounted it next to the existing outlet box. The outlet that exists does have wires to both the line and load screws. Can I just run pigtails to them or what? I have everything ready to go except for the connection.
 
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Old 06-10-03, 12:53 PM
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Yes, just use pigtails to connect what is currently connected to the "load" screws, plus your new cable, back to the "load" screws.
 
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Old 06-10-03, 01:07 PM
shalls
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Is there a way to tell which are the load screws and which are the line screws? or are you refering to black and white wires? Is it as simple as making sure the white wires are all attached to one another and the same with the blacks?
 
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Old 06-10-03, 01:21 PM
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On the back of the GFCI receptacle, you will find the words "LINE" and "LOAD" with some arrows pointing to the screws. If you want the GFCI to provide downstream protection, it is important not to connect all wires of the same color together.
 
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Old 06-10-03, 01:40 PM
shalls
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OK...one more thing I promise. After looking at it this morning I have realized that it is not a GFCI recep. I have one GFCI in the garage that supposedly protects all the outside circuits. Is this true? So with this one outlet not being a GFCI...how do I wire it?

Thanks so much for your help!
 
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Old 06-10-03, 02:51 PM
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Use a black pigtail to connect all the black wires to a brass screw.

Use a white pigtail to connect all the white wires to a silver screw.

Use a bare or green pigtail to connect all the bare wires to the green screw.

However, I must repeat my earlier advice: If you don't already have a couple of books on home wiring, pick a few up and read them before starting.

There is more to safe electrical work than making the right connections. Be careful.
 
  #11  
Old 06-11-03, 07:29 AM
shalls
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Just wanted to thank you for your advise. Everything worked great and the fountain is running with a nice hard wired switch.
 
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