alright, another question....


  #1  
Old 07-01-03, 05:40 PM
coachk
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alright, another question....

I just got done talking with a contractor, and I'm sure he know's what he's talking about, but I figure I'd just ask... I'm wanting to run an 220 electric line out to my shop in the backyard...about 150 feet away... I was told (by my neighbor) that I should get a 100 amp breaker for the shop and then have a subpanel at the shop entrance. The contractor said I don't have room in my box for a 100 amp breaker, but he could fit 2 50 amp beakers in there... My question: is there going to be any difference between a 100 amp breaker and 2 50 amp breakers??

Thanks for the help!
 
  #2  
Old 07-01-03, 07:54 PM
texsparky
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Find another contractor if what he is talking about is adding parrallel 50 amp 240 volt circuits.
Or is he talking about running (1) 50 amp 240 volt circuit that will be connected to a 2pole 50 amp breaker in the main panel?
 
  #3  
Old 07-01-03, 08:41 PM
J
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I believe breakers are all the same size. If he can fit 2 50 amps in he can fit 2 100 amps in. Maybe he meant your panel would be overloaded if you installed 100 amp.
 
  #4  
Old 07-01-03, 09:12 PM
coachk
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I'm not exactly sure what he meant (I don't think he meant the panel would be overloaded)...he made it sound like the 100 amp breaker was bigger and wouldn't fit into the remaining slots I have left in the panel... or maybe he just wanted to use the 50 amp breakers because they'd be cheaper... I remember him saying something about that now that I think about it...I've got a Federal Pacific Panel and the 100amp breaker is like $220......Guess I'll call him back in the morning and have him explain it again to me. Thanks!
 
  #5  
Old 07-01-03, 09:22 PM
J
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We're having trouble with your post because there is a lot here that doesn't make much sense.

A 50-amp feeder would reduce the cost in two ways, because it would allow the use of smaller wire and a smaller breaker. The key question is whether you need 50 amps or 100 amps. A 50-amp subpanel will provide 12KW of power. A 100-amp subpanel will provide 24KW. Do you need more than 12KW???
 
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Old 07-01-03, 09:24 PM
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If memory serves me Federal plug in breakers that are 100 amp require 4 spaces the 2 normal ones but also need the 2 spaces across from it. So it could be you don't have enough spaces left. I think your right about there price Federal lost there UL approval some years back and another company bought there name so prices for there stuff has been quite high
 
  #7  
Old 07-01-03, 09:31 PM
texsparky
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Thumbs down

I've got a Federal Pacific Panel and the 100amp breaker is like $220
Just 1 more reason to rid yourself of this Fire Prone panel !!!
 
  #8  
Old 07-02-03, 07:52 AM
coachk
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I remember him saying that I would need 4 spaces for the 100 amp breaker, and I went and looked... I only have 2 slots left. (I think he mentioned combining a couple of circuits to give me more room for the 100 amp breaker) Forgive me, but as you can tell, I don't know much about electrical work. I'm wanting to get power out to my shop and my next door neighbor just got done doing his, but he's from Mexico and a little hard to understand... He told me that I should get a 100 amp breaker for the main box and run the wire to a subpanel in the shop to control the different circuits out there. He said that I should run 220 out there, just in case I decide to get a welder or any other bigger piece of machinery. The contractor said something about using 2 50 amp breakers and using 6/3 SDT wire with ground to run the electricity through. He said it would be cheaper if I ran the wire through the attic and dug the trench myself (the trench is already done) and I wanted to run the wire today. What would be the best way to do this??
 
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Old 07-02-03, 07:56 AM
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I agree with throwing the obselete Fed panel out. Why drop another 200 in a panel thats suspect and awkward. I have finally ridded myself of the last of the Feds I own,, good riddins to the stab loc. I have a 5 gallon bucket of breakers if anyone is interested??? hahaha
 
  #10  
Old 07-02-03, 09:24 AM
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The rating of the feeder circuit-breaker depends on the "connected load'. A breaker rated at 50 amps MAY be adequate, but you'll have to describe what will be connected.The "shop-load" the usualy draws the most amps is a welder,followed by air-compressors.

Putting the issue of the rating of the CB and the condutor size aside, I suggest that you use 1-1/2" PVC conduit for the feeder conductors, and you may want to consider an additional PVC raceway for communication-cables.---Good Luck!!!
 
  #11  
Old 07-02-03, 11:14 AM
coachk
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I really don't have that much right now... a table saw, miter saw, belt sander, bunch of smaller power tools... I've got about 10 large Fluorescent lights (4 bulbs each) that I want to use, and I'm going to want to install a large exhaust fan to get some air flow through the shop. I do plan on getting a welder someday... I just want to be sure that I run enough electricity out there that I won't have to redo it...
 
  #12  
Old 07-02-03, 12:14 PM
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You can always run a 100A feeder, a 100A subpanel in the shop and connect it to a 50A breaker now (hopefully the 50A breaker will be able to accept the 100A wire gauge). You'll need to run a 4 wire feeder (2 hot, 1 neutral and 1 ground), and you'll need ground rods at the shop). AL wires are much cheaper then CU wires in this case.
 
  #13  
Old 07-02-03, 01:32 PM
coachk
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$984.00!?!?!?!

Alright, just talked to another contractor...... He wants $984.00 to install a 50 amp breaker in my main box and run the wire to my shop (it does include a new subpanel for the shop)... but I have to fish the wire from my box up and through the attic and out the other side of the house, I also dug the ditch in the yard (50 ft) to the shop and will be putting the conduit that goes in the ditch together myself... Does $984 sound a little too high for this? It seems like I'm doing most of the hard stuff....... Is this reasonable???
 
  #14  
Old 07-02-03, 01:53 PM
J
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How deep did you dig that trench?
 
  #15  
Old 07-02-03, 01:56 PM
coachk
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the trench is 18" deep....or pretty close
 
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Old 07-02-03, 02:12 PM
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"He want's $985"----What type and quantities of material is included in this quote,beyond a 2-pole CB and a basic panel. Be sure the panel is rated at 100 amps.
 
  #17  
Old 07-02-03, 02:25 PM
coachk
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as far as I know, all he is furnishing is the wire from the house to the shop (50 ft) and connecting it all together. I'm furnishing the wire (6/3 SDT with ground) that runs from the main box to the other side of the house (130 ft) and the conduit...

He told me not to get enough of the 6/3 wire to run to the shop, so I guess he plans on using something different for when the wire goes underground...
 
 

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