Moving entrance

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Old 08-18-03, 09:24 AM
Eric C
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Moving entrance

I have built a 30X40 addition on my house. now under roof.

I now have to move the meter (an expected part of the project)

I currently have a overhead entrance, and plan to run the new one underground.

The new meter will be about 30 feet from the breaker box. I know I will need a 200 amp disconnect.

I have calculated (correctly I hope) that i will need #4 AWG wire to connect between the breaker box, and the meter.

Does this run need to be in conduit ?

thanks!
 
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Old 08-18-03, 12:19 PM
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SE cable versus conduit (PVC, EMT, IMC, or RMC)
is really a matter of whats best for the location, code requirement, and preference. Personally I like conduit.
-->Give us some details as to where the cable/conduit need to go/go through etc. and we can give some refined advice for you to make the best choice.
I interpret that you want to know about the wiring method after the meter, and the underground is already determined?
Double checking: you need to use 4 wires between the disconnect mounted adjacent to/intregrated with the meter pan and the main panel, and same thing between a main and subpanels if there are any.

Wire size:
For copper:
a 100A service needs 4AWG, minimum, and a 8AWG ground (2-2-2-6 SE cable)
a 200A service needs 2/0 minimum, and 6AWG ground

Aluminum:
2awg and 6awg ground for 100
4/0 and 4awg ground for 200A

Personally I think conduit with individual wires for 4 or more large conductors is easier to work with. A regular 3wire flat SE cable is OK, but the larger and more wires the more difficult with cables.

gj
 
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Old 08-18-03, 12:39 PM
Eric C
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the underground part is taken care of, just mentioning it.

After I set the meter, the disconnect will be inside the house, going directly behind the meter.

the wire run between the breaker box, and the disconnect will go up through the wall, into the attic, and back down into the wall with the breaker box in it.

You are saying I need 4-conductors between the disconnect, and the breaker box ? -- I had assumed only 3,(hot, neutral, and ground) is the 4th for a additional ground ??

I had also assumed a 3-poll disconnect would be all I would need for the disconnect, is this correct?

Thanks so much for your help!
 
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Old 08-18-03, 01:04 PM
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MAJOR CLARIFICATION:
2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground. Nuetral and ground never get disconnected unless a rare situation occurs where the code identifies otherwise. Coming in from the road is 2 ungrounded, and 1 grounded. The groundING is established by grounding rods, and bonding to the water service/well and gas service (if applicable) ensures safety.

No, 2 pole disconnect.
Make SURE it has enough terminals for all nuetral and grounds.
Since you seem unaware of the grounding rules for service regarding seperate nuetral/ground, the main panel must now have the nuetrals and grounds seperated onto seperate bus bars. The nuetral buss bust be isolated from the panel frame. The whole reason is safety-the neutral system must ONLY be bonded to the grounding ONCE, which will be at the disconnect immediatly after the meter.

I'm sure you will have more questions. Don;t hesitate to ask. _____________gj
 
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Old 08-18-03, 02:04 PM
Eric C
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MAJOR CLARIFICATION:
2 hots, 1 neutral, 1 ground
DOH!! - I knew that-- I just wasn't thinking clearly--
The reason I asked about the 3-pole disconnect was the electric-supply store had one on close-out, quite a bit cheaper than the 2-pole 200-amp. I know the 2 hot wires are the ones disconnected, but wasn't sure if this would work for 2 wires only.

Since you seem unaware of the grounding rules for service regarding seperate nuetral/ground,
YUP -- I've done quite a bit of in-house stuff, and know the theory, but never actually had to do a service entrance.

My house has PVC plumbing, so a second grounding rod will be needed -- (you mentioned connecting to the plumbing earlier)

Would you care to elaborate a bit on the seperate buss for neutral and ground ? I thought they were always on a seperate buss ?
The ground is bonded to the frame of the breaker box,( which will need to be bonded to the disconnect now) and the neutral was on a seperate buss, usually towards the the top of the breaker box --

So can I run a wire (6awg I assume) bonded to the disconnect, and breaker box now ?


Like I said, this area is a bit new for me, thanks for taking your time to explain it !!!
 
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