Power pole intrusion


  #1  
Old 09-15-03, 08:50 PM
H
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Power pole intrusion

Just bought a property and there is a power pole approx. 40 feet inside the property line and then goes underground to the house which is only another 40 feet.

The pole is guyed toward the house

I intend to ask the power company to move the pole and will want them to guy (spelling?) it so it won't intrude on my property too much.

Am I going to have any luck with those guys and will I have to extend the wire going to the house myself? The meter is on the house and figured the underground part was also their domain.

Will they charge me anything?

Getting ready to call them, but want to be prepared about what to say and consider doing if they say no.

My latest survey doesn't show an easement, but the realtor told me one might exist anyway.


Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 09-16-03, 06:47 AM
J
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My guess is that if they agree to it at all, it will be on the condition that you foot the entire cost.
 
  #3  
Old 09-16-03, 08:37 AM
brickeyee
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I do not think an easement is required to run power to your own house. An easement would be required to run a line across your property that supplied a neighbor. They are very unlikely to move it for free since you purchased it the way it is.
 
  #4  
Old 09-16-03, 11:59 AM
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I agree with brickeyee about not needing an easement for the overhead secondary and service pole utilized to serve your house. Not sure about the guy wire. You say it is guyed toward the house. If the guy wire is for the secondary and service, then it is part of the facilities to serve YOU. But it seems to me that if it is for the secondary and service, it would be opposite the bisection of the angle between the two lines. Does it look like the guy is for an angle in the line where the secondary originates?
 
  #5  
Old 09-16-03, 02:45 PM
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Since the power only comes to the pole and doesn't leave it the strain is toward the power line. With the one wire on the pole the guy wire will need to be on the opposite side of the incoming power line. It is to counter act the force/weight of the power wire. I doubt you will be able to move it. Your only hope is if they decide you don't need it.

Or you could possibly extend the underground cable and eliminate the pole.
 
  #6  
Old 09-16-03, 05:48 PM
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More than likely that pole was put there at the former owners cost. No they will not move it for free guaranteed. as for the downguy request they install a sidewalk-guy these types oh down guys do not take up as much area. Might still cost you though.


good luck
 
  #7  
Old 09-17-03, 05:35 AM
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You're right. I didn't read correctly. I was thinking the service was overhead to the house also. My bad.
 
 

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