ground fault receptacles or breaker?


  #1  
Old 10-01-03, 06:19 PM
vermontdoc
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Question ground fault receptacles or breaker?

a home inspector noted that we do not have gfci receptacles as required by code, but the bathrooms and outdoor circuits are connected to a ground fault breaker on the electrical panel. is this not up to code? and if not, can I have one receptacle with the gfci and the others "down line" be of the regular type?

please note, this is just to get the house sold and be up to code, don't need no cadillac option here
 
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Old 10-01-03, 06:29 PM
J
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The GFCI breaker and receptacle do the same thing. Simply respond by saying that the receptacles in question are protected by a GFCI breaker. That should be the end of it.
 
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Old 10-01-03, 06:36 PM
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I agree with John. Breaker is as good as GFCI recepts.
Could he be refering to kitchen recepts not on GFCI?
For future reference, one GFCI breaker provides the same protection to all downstream non-GFCI recepts, as individual GFCI recepts or one GFCI recept at the front of the line and all others protected.
The inspector might want you to put a sticker on the recepts to indicate GFCI protection.
 
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Old 10-01-03, 06:44 PM
brickeyee
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And also note you are under no obligation to make any repairs to bring a house 'up to code'. Systems are grandfathered for changes made to the codes subsequent to the house being built. It is all negotiable,
 
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Old 10-01-03, 07:17 PM
J
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Although brick is correct that you are not under obligation to do anything at all that the home inspector recommends, providing GFCI protection (if it is indeed missing where current code requires) is an accommodation that almost all sellers make (because it is so easy and inexpensive and quick to do, and because the improvement in safety is so dramatic).
 
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Old 10-02-03, 05:11 AM
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There may be local codes that supercede the NEC. A local code may require, for instance, that all bathroom outlets be GFCI protected when the house is sold. This may mean that the seller has to do something with any bathroom outlets that are not GFCI protected.
 
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Old 10-02-03, 08:21 AM
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Art. 210.8 of the NEC requires GFI Interrupter Protection of specific circuits and specific receptacle-locations in Dwelling-Units without specifiying the exact design or type of such protection.

Art. 100 defines a GFI Circuit-Interrupter as "a device intended for the protection of personell" A GFI CB is such a "devise"
 
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Old 10-02-03, 07:42 PM
vermontdoc
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thanks for the awesome replies, I 'll probably have to go out and get a few gfci receps so I can get some of those stickers.

I appreciate the help! jeff
 
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Old 10-03-03, 11:18 AM
Jxofaltrds
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How can a home be required to "bring" it up to code unless it is unsafe?

What about ex post facto? (After the fact).

Do not be tricked into thinking you have to pay to upgrade anything. Let the buyer do this should they chose to buy your home.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 11:45 AM
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In many cases you can and will be required to bring your house up to certain elements of code.

Many states have requirements for smoke detectors and/or carbon monoxide detectors to be in place and working when a house is sold. Usually these only need to be battery operated and not interconnected.

I have seen local laws that require GFCI protected outlets in bathrooms, if there are any outlets in the bathroom, when the house is sold. (In other words, you are not required to add a GFCI outlet, but you are required to convert any existing outlets to be GFCI ptotected.)

You should also be aware of what existing code rules are, because a potential buyer may try to negotiate upgrading certain deficiencies (which may be perfectly legal based on year of installation) into the purchase price they offer, or may try to stipulate that they be done (and paid for) by you before closing.
 
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Old 10-03-03, 11:57 AM
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When I sold my last house, I was "dinged" because the kitchen circuits within X feet of the sink weren't GFI protected. I had a breaker GFI for the bathrooms too and misunderstood the Inspector's comment at first. Once clarified I replaced one outlet and got the kitchen electrical up to current code. My sales contract specified that I would make up to $200 in repairs based on the results of the inspection. This one was easy and cheap.

Doug M.
 
 

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