Question about GFCI Circuit


  #1  
Old 10-03-03, 11:14 AM
I
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Question about GFCI Circuit

Hi, I live in Ontario and read through the Electrical Code Simplified Book and haven't been able to find an answer for this.

In the book it says that anything with in 3Meters of a Bathtub or Sink must be protected by a GFCI Breaker or Outlet on the circuit. This may be a stupid question, but if there is an outlet on a wall that seperates the living room from the bathroom but facing the living room, does it still need to be protected by the GFCI circuit? It says anything within 3Meters, but I'm not sure if that means 3 Meters NEAR the tub/sink or 3 Meters facing the tub/sink. Does that make sense?

Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 10-03-03, 11:24 AM
brickeyee
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Get a copy of the actual code. I bet the rule only applies to outlets in the bathroom.
 
  #3  
Old 10-03-03, 11:30 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,245
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I am not familiar with Canadian requirements, but will give you some information.

Here in the US, the outlet would need to be in the same room to be required to have GFCI protection.

It is possible that an outlet in another room might be required to have protection, but only if it were within the specified distance along the wall. (By this I mean measuring the distance from the sink to the door inside the room, and then from the door to the outlet outside the room. ie, not through the wall, but through the door.)

I would be more concerned with how someone may use this outlet. I would think it unlikely that someone would plug a hairdryer, curler or razor into an outlet in another room or hallway and use it at the sink or tub, unless it were the only outlet available. If it were the only outlet available I would GFCI it, or better yet, add an outlet in the room with the sink, near the sink for use, which would be required to be GFCI protected.
 
  #4  
Old 10-03-03, 02:17 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,061
Received 521 Upvotes on 426 Posts
You don't measure through walls.
 
  #5  
Old 10-03-03, 04:22 PM
I
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 46
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks, I didn't see it as being a problem, I just want to make sure it's correct and to code when the Inspector comes to see it.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: