Phone wires


  #1  
Old 10-10-03, 11:23 AM
brewhill
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Phone wires

My phone line comes from the street to a Network Interface Device and then into the house where it lands on a “block” where the colored wires split and wrap around screws. This “block” is secured with thick bolts and covered with a gray rubber cover and the whole thing almost looks like an over-sized splitter.

Can I replace this “block” with a new junction box?

I also have a security system installed and it is included on this block. It looks like the black and yellow wires are “jumped”, will this present a problem when replacing the “block”?

Finally, I have modular phone wire and the jacks I bought have wire connectors. Can I just clip off the modular end, strip the wires and connect them to the jack? Are there jacks available where I can plug the modular wire in the back and then plug a phone into the front, similar to a cable TV jack?
 
  #2  
Old 10-10-03, 11:36 AM
R
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You need to explain this better.

Are you certain that what you are describing as a network interface is really that? A true network interface ends with a modular connector that you must attach to. Not all houses have network interfaces.

Your security system is probably wired into the telephone line so that it can call the central office when the alarm goes off. This is usually done with modular connectors and a special jack that deactivates the phones in the house so that the call can be made reagrdless of someone else being on the line. You certainly want to keep this functionality intact and not screw it up.

Generally speaking you can do what you want after the network interface. Keep in mind, however, that the phone company will not bail you out (for free anyway) if you screw up on your side of the network interface.

Modular cables are not generally used from the point of entry to the phone jacks. Modular wires do not fare well when run through walls, and have very poor shielding. One generally uses heavier guage wire to go to each jack. You will find modular wire very hard to strip once you cut off the modular connector.
 
  #3  
Old 10-10-03, 11:46 AM
brewhill
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The phone line from the street comes into a gray box, that I think is a network interface, and then a wire comes into the "block" that I described.

Maybe I'm not using the right terminology but this gray box looks like items that have been referred to as network interfaces.

Thanks for your help!
 
  #4  
Old 10-10-03, 12:03 PM
R
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The "gray box: you are describing is NOT a network interface. It is a disconnect box. The phone companies have started placing these boxes on the outside of houses so that they replace outdoor wiring to the poles when nobody is home to let them into the house or garage.

A network interface is about the size of phone jack. The phone company wires will connect to it. Your side of the picture connects to the network interface via the modular connector on the nwtwork interface.
 
  #5  
Old 10-10-03, 12:22 PM
brewhill
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I have attached a picture of what the gray box outside of my house looks like.

Thanks for your help! I'm new to this and just want to replace the "block" to clean up the wires and the look of the "block" as I'm remodeling.
 
  #6  
Old 10-10-03, 02:16 PM
brickeyee
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The gray box on the side of the house is the demarche between you and the phone company. The block you are seeing in the basement sounds like an old lightening arrestor block. The outside box contains this protection know (should be a ground rod attached if it was installed correctly) and you can remove the old inside one if you wish.
 
  #7  
Old 10-10-03, 02:24 PM
R
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I do not agree with brickeyee, although you have not posted the link to your picture, so I cannot be sure.

The gray box outside of my house is not the end of the phone company connection, and does not handle the grounding of the line. The end of the phone company line and the connection to ground are inside my garage. As such, I cannot mess with them.

I suspect that you do not have a network interface, and that you have an old fashioned connection, which is still a valid means to connect inside wiring.

If you mess with telephone company wiring, you may endanger yourself and family, and you will piss off the phone company.

If you ask, the phone company will come out and connect a network interface for you at no charge, especially if you tell them you have new phones to hook up and that you are unsure how to connect to their wiring. If you are there when the installer shows up, you may even be able to have him or her advise you on your other connections.
 
  #8  
Old 10-10-03, 06:31 PM
brickeyee
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The grey box is where the phone comnpanies responsibility ends. There is a modular inside that jumps to screw terminals for additional wiring into the premisis. You are responsable for everything after the screw terminals. The phone company service ends right there. If you call them for anything after that you will incur a service charge to repair wiring that is your responsablility.
 
  #9  
Old 10-10-03, 10:16 PM
J
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Does the gray box say anything on it?
 
  #10  
Old 10-11-03, 07:56 AM
CSelectric
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Without seeing the system, I can only speculate.

The gray box outside is the demarcation box. As brick stated, this is where the ownership of the lines ends.

The black terminal block does sound quite a lot like an arrestor block.

It also sounds quite like an old four wire system.

So, the question is, do you want to clean it up, or do you want to bring it up to current standards? If cleanliness is your only reason, i'd leave well enough alone. The system functions and doesn't look any worse than the rest of the phone installations of that era.

On the other hand, the four wire system combined with the arrestor and the old demarcation block do not make for a real sound installation, when compared to the modern standards.

If you happen to have cable internet service, then it probably doesn't matter. But, if your using dial up, I guarantee you your performance is not what it could be.

If that's the case, I'd recommend asking the phone company for a network interface to replace your old demarkation box. Then I'd yank the arrestor black and replace it with a 110 punch down block (check home depot in the telecom shelves of the electrical department.) Then I'd replace the wiring with Cat 5E (at least to the jack that the computer is hooked to.)
 
  #11  
Old 10-11-03, 09:19 AM
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Perhaps a"punch-block"would be a solution, but you need a special tool for this which costs approx $75----Submit your Q to the "Voice & Data Communications" Section of this Forum.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!
 
  #12  
Old 10-11-03, 02:11 PM
R
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Once again, be very careful. The gray box outside my house is not where the phone company wire ends. The gray box was installed to make it easier for the phone company to replace the wiring to the pole, without them having to enter the house.

Where I live, the phone company owns, maintains, and is responsible beyond the gray box and into my garage where the network interface is located.

I am only allowed to connect to the network interface, I am not allowed to touch the gray box, and it even says so on it.

Do not assume anything, ask the phone company.
 
  #13  
Old 10-11-03, 09:54 PM
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racraft,
Who is the provider you have? I'm curious. (for my own knowlegde)
(I am not doubting your sincerity about YOUR provider's terms of service)
You are the odd one here, who has the rare coverage of wiring beyond an outdoor enclosure. There was a period of time when the old "black block" era was over and the demarc units were small, and were installed indoors. (1980s I believe) After that, the NID served as a demarc outdoors, solving all problems. Personally, I belive the policy of their responcibility stopping outside is best, that way there is no reason for them to come inside.

gj
 
  #14  
Old 10-12-03, 06:02 AM
R
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My provider is Verizon.

When I moved into the house (14 years ago) there was no network interface, and only one telepohone in the house. When I had phone service turned on, the installer put in a network interface in the garage inplace of the traditional terminal block. I then installed my own terminal block that connects to the network interface via the modular connector. I then added telephones in various places in the house.

About five years ago we had a bad storm where a tree was blown over, ripping the phone, cable and electric wires away from the house. When the phone company came out to replace the wiring they installed a gray box on the ourtside of my home. They never entered my garage, they simpky used the existing wiring. They used new wire to go from the gray box to the pole.

The gray box is marked "Property of Bell Atlantic. No user serviceable parts inside. Do not open." It requires a keyed hex driver to unlock, although I could probably open it with a pair of neeld nose pliers.

The installer explained to me that they use these boxes to avoid having to enter people's homes or garages. I asked about the network interface in the garage, and he assured me that they were still responsible for everything up to the network interface.

Perhaps they do something different for new installs, or in different parts of the country. They may even do something new in this area now. However, my telephone directory makes it clear that Verizon is responsible up to the network interface, their installer made it clear that they were responsible, and I would certainly hold them to that if a problem came about.
 
 

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