Power to workshop


  #1  
Old 10-11-03, 10:45 AM
djayha1's Avatar
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Power to workshop

we have a new home, 200 amp panel w/3 slots for breakers available, I'm building a workshop 15- 20' from house, can i use the available breakers in panel for workshop? one for lighting the other two for outlets in shop? "Home is total electric"
And if i can, what type of wire should i use?, I know it goes by lenth,useage, ect. I plan on having three florescent fictures hanging from cieling, ea. on seperate switches, 10 outlets total, 3-2-3-2, No 220 outlets, just 110 and of course all will not be used at same time! building will be 12'X 16' Hope i included enough details! Thanks

 
  #2  
Old 10-11-03, 12:49 PM
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Use #6 THWN copper conductors and a 60-amp 2-pole breaker, and a #8 Green Equiptment Grounding Conductor.There are some Grounding issues to adress, such as a Ground-rod for a "detached" stucture, isolating the Neutral (White wire) from Ground at the new sub-panel, and a seperate terminal-bar for connecting the Branch-Circuit EGC's at the new sub-panel.

Good Luck and Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-03, 05:22 PM
J
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djayha1,

PATTBAA has given you information about how to put a subpanel in your shop. Depending on how much power you need there, however, you may or may not need a subpanel. If you can get by without a subpanel, the solution will be much simpler.

PATTBAA provides 14.4KW of power with a subpanel. Without a subpanel, you will be limited to 4.8KW. It would be even simpler if you could get by with 2.4KW. So the $64 question is: can you get by with 2.4KW, do you need 4.8KW, or do you need 14.4KW?

P.S. You should be aware that code prohibits running multiple circuits from your house panel to a detached building. So if your question, "can i use the available breakers in panel for workshop" meant that you would run three circuits from the panel to the workshop, the answer is "no".
 
  #4  
Old 10-11-03, 06:23 PM
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If you want more than 2 circuits then you need the sub panel. You can run one cable which can contain 2 circuits in a multiwire set up or you can use the same one cable to power a sub panel.
 
  #5  
Old 10-11-03, 06:36 PM
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What Joe said is correct, but he used terms that might be misleading to some. Without a subpanel, you are only allowed one circuit, not two. What Joe refers to is that this one circuit can be one multiwire circuit, which gives you the same power as two regular circuits.

Didn't want anybody to infer that they could run two circuits.
 
  #6  
Old 10-12-03, 09:39 AM
brickeyee
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Consider what tools you plan on using and installing in the future. I need a 240 V, 45 A circuit to get a 3 hp Unisaw up and running. Add a dust collector starting and running at the same time and the draw can get pretty high. My other power hog is a 3 phase bandsaw running on a 3 phase idler motor. A 60 amp panel might be a little marginal. If you use smaller tools, it would probably be fine.
 
 

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