Electrical circuit


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Old 11-08-03, 04:37 PM
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Electrical circuit

In designing my basement general use electrical circuit I have determined I will need to run two lines to deliver the proper amount of power (1200 sgf) Rather than run two separate lines, is it proper to run 10/3 + ground in one loop around my basement.

I would power the first set of outlets with the black and the second set of outlets with the red

All outlets would share the neutral & ground

I would use a 20 amp piggy back breaker at the panel.

Any problems with the above.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 04:45 PM
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What you have described is fine. Why the 10/3? You only need 12/3 for a 20 amp circuit. I don't think receptacles can accept #10 wire. You may need to pigtail #12 wire at each box.
You are required to connect the whites with a pigtail. The neutral connection can not depend on the receptacle in a multi wire circuit.
You must also make sure that the two breakers used for the red and black wires are on opposite legs. You should be able to measure 240 between the red and black.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 04:47 PM
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First tell us what is your version of a "20 amp piggy back breaker at the panel". If it is (2) half sized breakers or twin breakers, they will both be served by the same hot conductor in the main panel, and thus you cannot install a multiwire circuit from them.
If you could install two single breakers on different hots (phases) within your panel, then technically it will work within code requirements.
You will find 10/3 very difficult to work with when connection to the receptacles, and box fill will be more difficult.
Most would suggest (although not require) to use two seperate circuits with seperate cables and not the multiwire circuit you describe.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 05:01 PM
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I used seven general-use circuits when I finished my 1100 square foot basement. You might think a bit about how much flexibility you'll have with only two (the code-mandated minumum), and about how much easier it is to run more circuits now than later.

Also, I generally think multiwire circuits are a bad idea for a DIYer.
 
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Old 11-08-03, 05:12 PM
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Thanks for your replies. Actually I would use 12 ga wire. I guess I will go with separate circuits instead of the multiwire (I was looking to save space in the panel) as its a heavy electric use house: cook top , double ovens, well, jacuzzi, water heater ....

As for circuits I do have more than two, I have a dedicated 20 amp for the treadmill, a dedicate 15 am for the central vac, 2 general electrical circuits, and two lighting circuits but I think I will make the general electrical 3 based on John's comments
 
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Old 11-09-03, 07:16 AM
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Multi wire circuits don't save any space in the panel. You still require 2 breakers.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 11:16 AM
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Multi wire circuits do save space in the panel, at the ground/neutral bar(s). One ground and one neutral vs two grounds and two neutrals.
 
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Old 11-09-03, 03:05 PM
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In some cases, multiwire circuits cost space in the panel. Two separate circuits can be wired from a tandem breaker, but you (usually**) need two full-size breakers for a multiwire circuit.

** Yea, I know.
 
 

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