2 wires to 3 wires and can I add a plug to wire


  #1  
Old 11-08-03, 05:38 PM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
2 wires to 3 wires and can I add a plug to wire

I have read alot of the posts in this forum - John Nelon answered one of my questions - what to do with the ground wire of the fixture (fan) if the connector box only has 2 wires
"If the box is metal, connect it to the box or to the mounting bracket. Otherwise, just make sure it stays out of the way."
*The existing fan that was there had the ground wire just laying there - not connected - so that is what I did with the new fan's ground wire when I replaced it - moved it out of the way.

-----------
Another question: I want to install 2 recessed lighting fixtures - the wiring is 2 wires no ground in the house and the new lights have a ground.
Is it safe to use the 2 wires no ground for the new lights - the old light will not be used anymore?
Or if I run new wire - can I add a plug to the end of it and plug it into an outlet that was brought into the house from the barn and it has a ground? And the outlet must have a higher amp - because it is 3 prong outlet -

----------
This house was built in the 1860's - so when they wired ... well - let's just say they wired it...
 
  #2  
Old 11-08-03, 05:44 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
It is legal to install ungrounded lighting fixtures if you don't have a grounding connection in the box.

You may not add a plug to a fixture designed to be hard wired.

Your statement, "And the outlet must have a higher amp - because it is 3 prong outlet" is meaningless to me.

At some time in the future if you have the time and/or money, consider rewiring your house with new wire that includes a ground.
 
  #3  
Old 11-08-03, 06:00 PM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the quick!! reply!!

I guess I assumed the 3 prong outlet was a 20amp instead of 15 amps - but now that you questioned it and I thought about it - 3 prongs means it is grounded - but it could be 15 or 20 amps - I will have to trace it back to the barn wiring box to find out. If it is 15amps - then I could run new wire for the recessed lighting and hard wire it into that wire. I mentioned the plug thinking it would be much easier to add a plug to the new wire end then it would be to cut the power and tap into the wire.

Thanks Again!
 
  #4  
Old 11-09-03, 09:00 AM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
New Question:

If I use the existing 2 wire no ground light wiring - put in 2 recessed lights & connect those 2 lights with new 3 wire wire - should I connect the lights' ground wires to the ground wire in the connector wire?

Thanks!
 
  #5  
Old 11-09-03, 11:14 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,245
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If you are adding new junction boxes for new lights, then the wiring must be grounded, you cannot tap into an existing circuit. The only option you have is to tie into a circuit that is properly grounded (and there are restrictions there), or to run a new circuit all the way back to the panel.

If you are simply replacing light fixtures (where the box already exists), then there is no requirement to add a ground.
 
  #6  
Old 11-09-03, 04:01 PM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I am not sure what you mean by a new junction box. I have a light in the room - I am going to remove that light fixture - connect the 2 wires no ground to the new recessed light that has a ground - then run a new wire that has a ground from that light to a 2nd light that has a ground and connect it.

Should I use the ground wire on the lights and connect them to the ground wire in the wire between them or just remove the ground all together since there is no ground in the wire back to the box?
 
  #7  
Old 11-09-03, 04:05 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,245
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Your new light requires a juntion box. That is, an electrical box that is installed in the ceiling. This junction box is where the wires connect. The new box can be plastic or metal. If your new light is another recessed light then it has it's own built in electrical box.

To be legal, this new fixture should be grounded, as it is a new fixture and not a replacement fixture.

How would you remove the ground wire? You cannot pull a wire out of a cable.
 
  #8  
Old 11-09-03, 08:35 PM
V
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: USA
Posts: 34
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Okay - I thought that is what a junction box was - it just sounded like it was something else. Yes - both lights have a metal junction box - the light's ground wire is connected to the light with a screw & I would just not use the ground wire in the cable..

Anyhow - I will run new grounded wire for the new lights. I wanted to find out what options I had with the existing wiring.
It is much easier connecting into what is there and not paving a new path.

Thank you!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: