replacing light fixture - knob and tube


  #1  
Old 11-13-03, 02:16 PM
seattle23
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replacing light fixture - knob and tube

the electricals in my 1923 house are on circuit breakers - all except for the main floor overhead lights, which are powered by knob and tube wiring in the attic. I want to replace the overhead fixtures in the kitchen (and I may need to repair one entirely - I think I broke it the other day...). if these were on circuits, I'd just trip the switches to turn off the power while I replaced the fixtures; but what does one do when they're run by knob and tube wiring. getting electrocuted is not on my list of things to do...thanks for any info.!
 
  #2  
Old 11-13-03, 02:34 PM
J
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Knob and tube is a wiring method.
Circuit breakers are an overcurrent protection method.
Neither precludes the other.
I am confused.
 
  #3  
Old 11-13-03, 02:41 PM
seattle23
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so am I! I am new at this, can you tell? I did trip the breakers that I thought governed the kitchen fixtures, but the lights never went off. that's why I thought that maybe they weren't related to each other.

can I amend/change the question? if an outlet (run by knob and tube) goes bad, is it more difficult/specialized to replace than one powered by "modern" wiring?
 
  #4  
Old 11-13-03, 06:38 PM
J
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If you have tripped all the breakers in your panel (including the main), and the kitchen fixtures still have power, then you likely have another panel (fuse or breaker) somewhere else in your house. You should not do any work on these fixtures until you verify that you have killed power to them.

I would not want to replace fixtures on knob and tube wiring unless absolutely necessary. The risk is that you will damage the insulation on that old wire during the project. If anything goes wrong, be prepared to rewire the whole circuit. If you don't want to risk that, then leave the fixtures alone.
 
 

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