dedicated and hardwired?


  #1  
Old 11-14-03, 04:08 PM
Guz
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Question dedicated and hardwired?

Hi.
I need to understand what I’ve just read in a manual for a Whirpool/Bathing Pool Cadet 5'x36"
2771.XXXW Series American Standard.

-“The Whirpool should be installed on a 120 vac, 15 amp dedicated circuit. The circuit should be
hard-wired from the electrical power supply panel. The circuit must be a (3) wire circuit from the
electrical supply panel. A grounded neutral wire and a third wire, earth ground, are essential.”

They also say:
- “Run a dedicated 15amp GFCI protected electrical line


(A)

What I can understand:
1-“The Whirpool should be installed on a 120 vac, 15 amp dedicated circuit.”

What I don’t get:
2- “The circuit should be hard-wired from the electrical power supply panel”
QUESTION:
What is the difference between 1 (dedicated) and 2 (hardwired)?



(B)

I know they ask for:
- “Run a dedicated 15amp GFCI protected electrical line”.

QUESTIONS:
Since I have a Power Supply Panel with 200A :
-Can I put a 20amp (not 15) GFCI protected electrical line with an UF-B 12/2 Outdoor
Electrical Wire with Ground, (that I have already in place) and put the extra ground bar?
Or
-Must be through separated cables (White, Black and ground) into conduit?
-Is dangerous to put a GFCI 20A circuit instead of GFCI 15A one?



Thank you, I hope you could answer all this questions.
 
  #2  
Old 11-14-03, 07:07 PM
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2- “The circuit should be hard-wired from the electrical power supply panel”
What is the difference between 1 (dedicated) and 2 (hardwired)?

Dedicated means no other openings (nothing else should share this circuit)

Hardwired generaly means permanent wireing back to the source. (No extension cords)

-Can I put a 20amp (not 15) GFCI protected electrical line
No you must follow the manufacturers recomendations. Too large of a breaker will not protect the wiring and components of the tub.


You can use the exsisting 12/2wground if it is not used for anything else otherwise you need a new cable.


What's the extra ground bar for ?

-Must be through separated cables (White, Black and ground) into conduit?
No not unless your city or town require it or if the instalation of romex would violate code.

-Is dangerous to put a GFCI 20A circuit instead of GFCI 15A one?
Yes it is dangerous always follow manufacturers reccomendations (who knows their products better than them?)and code requires it
 
  #3  
Old 11-14-03, 09:54 PM
Guz
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Arrow 2 grounds?

Extra ground?
It’s because I saw the diagram where I see a GFCI outlet with a black wire, a white wire and a third wire exiting and going right to a rod as a ground. Then, since the romex has a ground wire already all the way to the breakers box… or.. must I ground the pomp just to the rod?

Now… let me make sure, an appliance who’s plug is connected to the only outlet in a dedicated circuit is a hard wired one?… Plug>outlet>NM cable>Main Box?

By the way, the pomp’s cable comes too short, and it is on the corner side (not the access side of the tub), therefore, If I don’t want the GFCI right below the tub and very near from the floor, I have to make it go through the wall and connect it to the GFCI in the other side of the wall, which happen to be a bedroom… sounds kind of wird right?… but it’s in the corner side and too short to reach a good height from the floor and a good distance from the tub…

Any thoughts?
 
  #4  
Old 11-14-03, 10:24 PM
J
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I saw the diagram where I see a GFCI outlet with a black wire, a white wire and a third wire exiting and going right to a rod as a ground.
Burn that diagram. And please tell us where you saw it so we can burn the other copies too.
 
  #5  
Old 11-15-03, 02:35 AM
Guz
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Question Here you are

Here is the source of my confusion,

http://www.americanstandard-us.com/p...nstall_213.pdf[

Is in a 4 pages PDF format, but the diagram I’m talking about is in page 3.
Above the diagram there’s a paragraph asking for a dedicated and hardwired circuit (no cord, no
plugs?... but in the diagram I see a cord, a Plug and an Outlet).

Am I missing something?
If there’s a contradiction in there... should I atach to the printed words or to the diagram images?

“To hardwire or not to hardwire... that is the question”

The pomp comes with a short cord and plug.
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-03, 05:37 AM
R
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The diagram is misleading, but not incorrect.

The diagram is an electrical diagram, not a wiring diagram.

An electrical diagram shows what will electrically be on each wire. The diagram is correct because it shows the white and black wires connected to 120 VAC, and the ground connected to ground. The diagram does not say where the 120 VAC and the ground come from.

A wiring diagram shows how and where to connect the wires. If this were a wiring doagram, it would show the connections all the way back to the panel.

Also please pay attention to the wiring size chart. Even though you will be using a 15 amp circuit breaker, you will be using larger wire than would normally be on a 15 amp circuit in a residence.
Note that the paragraph above the picture explains that the wires (all three of them) must run completely back to the panel and be properly connected.
 

Last edited by racraft; 11-15-03 at 06:01 AM.
  #7  
Old 11-15-03, 08:37 AM
hotarc
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How far is the tub from your service panel? If your cable run is 150' or more, you'll need to step it up to #10 wire.

Basically what you need to is run your 12/2 , or 10/2, cable from the service panel, without any interruptions, to a GFCI receptacle near the tub. Connect the cordset to the pump and plug it into the GFCI. Before you fill up the tub with water, make sure your GFCI is functioning properly by pressing the "TEST" button.

Also, GFCI's like exercise. TEST and RESET the receptacle on a monthly basis.
 
  #8  
Old 11-15-03, 09:09 AM
J
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The diagram uses the standard electrical symbol for ground. It does not show a grounding rod, is not mean to indicate a grounding rod, and must not be a grounding rod.

This is analogous to using the zig-zag line as a symbol for a resistor. That doesn't mean to bend your wire into a zig-zag shape.
 
 

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