Constant Humming from Electric Baseboard Heater


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Old 11-15-03, 07:19 PM
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Constant Humming from Electric Baseboard Heater

I had a 6 foot electric baseboard installed today. I hear no ticking whatsoever. However, I hear a constant Humming. Does this sound Normal, or Does it sound like a bad install or something not done correctly?
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:00 PM
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If you place your hand on the heater, does the humming stop?
Touch (with a glove if needed) various parts of the heater and see if the humming stops.
It is either a vibrating hum from one of the parts, or a hum induced by the incomming power. Hum induced by the incomming power is unusual, since there is no amplifier like a steroe to hear the 60hz hum.
Try it and let us know.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:06 PM
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I just put my hand on the heater. It does not stop. The electrician told me the hum is coming from the electric current. However, the humming does not stop. I have had the heater on for 4 hours straight now and it has not stopped humming.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:19 PM
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Hum induced by the incomming power is unusual. Yes, the hum is being induced by the incoming power. According to the electrician, the hum is from the electric current. THe hum as stated is continuous and Never ends.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:52 PM
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It might very well be a vibration due to the incomming power, but it is unsusual to be amplified from a heater to the audible range.
For example, a transformer may have an audible hum, but it is not the incomming power attempting to escape, it is the laminations of the steel vibrating within, due to the normal magnatism changes.
Your heater might be huming due to the incomming power, but it is probably a quality issue with the heater as its components vibrate, not a normal consequence of electricity energizing a heater.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:53 PM
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A question I didn't ask, when the heater cycles off due to reaching temperature setting on the thermostat, does the humming stop? If it doesn't, then we have bigger problems.
 
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Old 11-16-03, 06:57 PM
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If it doesn't, then we have bigger problems.


No,the Humming never stops. Please explain what you think is wrong.
 
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Old 11-17-03, 07:27 AM
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What kind of heater did you put in? (brand, etc). Does it have an internal thermostat, or is it external (on the wall)?
 
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Old 11-17-03, 08:08 AM
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it is a Marley heater. Model #2516. The thermostat is a King thermostat and is on the wall.
 
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Old 11-17-03, 10:23 AM
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If you have a remote (on the wall) thermostat there should be no power at all to the heater when the T-stat is not calling for heat. The T-stat should be double pole (where both hot legs are shut off). No power means no possible humming, unless something else is causing the heater to vibrate and resonate.
 
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Old 11-17-03, 08:12 PM
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Yes, when the thermostat is set at its lowest the humming stops.

I had the electrician come over today again. ON Saturday he installed a 120 volt 1500 electric baseboard on a new single circuit. Now he plans to install a 240 volt 1500 electric bb on the same circuit in the next day or two. He brought over another 120 volt heater tonight and we heard the same constant humming. He did say it was abnormally loud humming to him.

He basically is going to install the same 220 heaters on the same wires as he was with the 110. Now I am wondering if it is wrong that he is going to put a 110 or 220 volt heater on the same circuit?.


he did say though he normally installs 220 volt and perhaps the 220 volt will be more quiet due to less current.
 
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Old 11-18-03, 04:35 AM
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He is not going to put the 220 volt heater on the same circuit as the 110 volt heater. he is going to use the same wires, but he is going to make a very different connection at the breaker panel.

220 volts requires both legs of the incoming service. Each side carries 110 volts. When you measure between the legs you get 220. When you measure between either leg and the neutral you get 110 volts.

Your electrician is going to change the breaker from a 110 breaker to a 220 breaker, and he is going to move the neutral from the neutral/ground bar to the other hot leg og the 220 breaker.
 
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Old 11-18-03, 08:01 AM
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And I'm hoping he will replace the single pole T-stat with a double pole T-stat.
 
 

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