power transfer switch info please


  #1  
Old 11-21-03, 12:14 PM
L
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power transfer switch info please

new 5,000 watt generator

need to know how a power transfer switch works.

does it provide power to the main panel or only to dedicated
breakers within the panel box.

i would prefer a transfer switch that powers the whole
panel and i choose which breakers i run.

i want to have a weather proof plug mounted outside
that i wheel the generator to and plug in. then run the
appropriate type of electrical wire to the power transfer switch
in the basement next to the panel box.

any suggestions or answers would be appreciated

thank you
 
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Old 11-21-03, 02:04 PM
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5000 is not alot of generator to transfer the whole house. You'll have to be quite diciplined with what you turn on as to not over load it.

What size service do you have? You'll need a main transfer switch and have an electrician install it. This is a big double throw switch. Your panel is in the middle position, the utility is on one incoming line and the gen is on the other. This is so you cannot ever have to gen and utility feeding in at the same time.
Most electrical equpiment manufacturers have them and you'll need to go to a supply house to get one or better yet let your electrician get the one he usually uses.

Remember, it is extremely dangerous and against the law to back feed your panel by using a male-to-male type cord and just turning off the main breaker. Some will say this is OK as long as you're careful. They are WRONG!
 
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Old 11-21-03, 02:11 PM
brickeyee
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You will find the transfer switch very expensive. It must be rated for use as service equipment and have an ampacity at least as great as the main breaker in the panel it feeds. Installing a sub panel with a limited number of critical circuits is usually more cost effective.
 
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Old 11-21-03, 02:36 PM
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Old 11-21-03, 03:12 PM
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Just recently replaced my circuit breaker panelboard with
http://reliancecontrols.com/main-breaker.htm#tt-v
Model TTV2003CR.
It is not that much difference in cost from the fully rated transfer switch, and it is a great way to have choices as to which loads in your home you want on or off at any given time. As mentioned, you will have to be careful as to how many things are on at any given time. Many homes will operate fine with a 5kW generator, as long as you don't do anything crazy like turn on a big heater or air conditioner unit.
 
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Old 11-21-03, 05:14 PM
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If your panel is a Square D QO they make a double lock out device to back feed the panel though an additional breaker installed in the panel. The mechanical device prevents the main and the gen breaker from being on at the same time.

Here is the link
http://ecatalog.squared.com/pubs/Ele...272-256-03.pdf
 
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Old 11-22-03, 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by joed
If your panel is a Square D QO they make a double lock out device to back feed the panel though an additional breaker installed in the panel. The mechanical device prevents the main and the gen breaker from being on at the same time.

Here is the link
http://ecatalog.squared.com/pubs/Ele...272-256-03.pdf
Square D also makes them for homeline panels.
--
Tom H
 
 

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