Learning the hard way!


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Old 11-28-03, 12:41 PM
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Learning the hard way!

I bought 4 Fluorescent lights for my barn. Then I read the label and it said may not work under 50 degrees.
I need someone to give me a good "lesson" in Fluorescent lighting for outdoor applications, including the money saving models which work more efficiently.
Changeling
 
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Old 11-28-03, 01:40 PM
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Either use H.O. (high output) or electronic fixtures.
 
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Old 11-28-03, 03:25 PM
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Speedy, you have be confused with someone who knows what they are doing! I have absolutely no idea what you are talking about!
Like I said, I need an instruction course in depth. Sorry to be short, just having a bad day, week, month, whatever.
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Old 11-28-03, 03:42 PM
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High output flourescent fixtures have a starting temperature of 0 deg. F. This is the type of fixture you you need to install. You may be able to find fixtures with electronic ballasts which also have the low starting temp, but I don't think this is the answer for you.
HO fixtures are what is used in outdoor signs, under soffits, in barns, unheated garages, etc..

Go to an electrical supply house and ask for HO fluorescents in the bulb configuration you need. IE; 2 light 8 foot, 2 light 4 foot, etc.
 
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Old 11-29-03, 11:59 AM
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Speedy is the HO also the high efficiency reason for cheap operation are is this something else?
What is the cheapest way to get these type fixtures?
Changeling
 
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Old 11-29-03, 01:26 PM
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I'm not sure what you mean by high efficiency. You may be thinking of electronic ballast fixtures which use 32 watt lamps as opposed to 40 watt in a 4 foot fixture.
Why is this a concern? Will you have 20 or 30 fixtures? Even at those numbers the cost savings will not be huge. How often will the lights be on in a barn?

Have you though abot HID (high intensity discharge) lighting such as mtal halide lamps? Something like high bay fixtures would be a good choice.



I would go to a supply house and ask to see the different ones and their wattage ratings.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 12:07 PM
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I call it a barn but it's actually my work shop and storage for my tractor and tiller. It's 24 by 28 foot with 2foot overhanging roof. It is built on 6x6's that go up to the edge of a drop off into a valley. At the back overlooking the valley I installed sliding glass doors. in the front is a 9 foot garage type door. It is awesome!
What is HID lighting, never heard of it.
Changeling
 
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Old 11-30-03, 12:31 PM
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HID's are a type of lamp. An example of one type of fixture is the one pictured above.
Now knowing the size of the building I wouldn't recommend them.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 06:40 PM
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Just like to add if you want quality & good prices checkout ruudlighting.com aswell as getting prices from a supplyhouse.
 
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Old 12-01-03, 11:00 AM
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Thanks guys, I will follow the advise, until my hand heals all I can do is investigate all my problems and buy the supplies. All you guys are making this a lot easier and I am sure a lot better.
Changeling
 
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Old 12-02-03, 09:05 AM
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Just thought I'd add here for what it's worth..
It sounds like we bought the same 4 footers designed for tempt over 50 degrees changeling.
I installed mine in the carriage house (same approx size as your barn) and the only noticable difference so far is that they flicker for the first 5 minutes until they have warmed up. I have'nt seen anyone say that they are unsafe, so I can live with it.
 
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Old 12-02-03, 12:15 PM
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WGM if all they did was flicker for a few minutes I could live with that also, but I don't want to go to the trouble of installing them to find out they don't work. On the box it says will not work. If the company has no faith in them I certainly don't.
Changeling
 
 

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