Six Foot Rule

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Old 11-30-03, 01:43 PM
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Six Foot Rule

Confirmation on the 6 foot rule when wiring outlets:

Is each wall taken separately, and the 6 foot rule applied, or is it total linear feet around a rooms perimeter so the horizontal distance from an outlet on one wall is measured around a interior corner ?
 
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Old 11-30-03, 02:09 PM
J
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First of all, the rule applies to "wall spaces," not "walls". A corner (inside or outside) is invisible to a wall space. Usually only a door opening begins or terminates a wall space.

Having said that, no point on a wall space can be more than six feet from a receptacle (measured horizontally along the baseboard). This rule assumes that the cord will not cross a doorway. This usually means that the first receptacle must be within six feet of either side of a door opening, and no more than every twelve feet thereafter. Wall spaces under two feet need no receptacle, but wall spaces two feet or more will need at least one receptacle.

The so-called "six-foot rule" only applies to finished living spaces. It does not apply to unfinished spaces, bathrooms, closets, hallways, or kitchens. All of these have their own rules which are different than the six-foot rule.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 02:25 PM
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Just to add.
Wall space behind door swings are not included, the measurement starts at the edge of the open door. Also fixed glass panels (such as the fixed section of a slider) count as wall space as well as railings.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 02:38 PM
R
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I'll add one more consideration.

What the NEC requires (described above) is the minimum. You may very well want to add more outlets.

Several examples:

You may very well want an outlet on a small (less than two foot) section of wall. I have just such a piece of wall in one one of my bedrooms. It does have an outlet, and it where we plug in the vaccuum cleaner. The other outlets are harder to get at and/or contain devices that would have to be unplugged.

If you are planning on using the space to hold computers or power electronics (stereo, TV, DVD, VCR, etc.), you may want to have several outlets close together for these devices.

In other words, think about how the space will be utilized and where you will want to have outlets. Go over several plans in your mind and/or on paper, then design outlets appropriately. After that, make sure that your outlets meet the code requirements, adding others as necessary.
 
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Old 11-30-03, 04:19 PM
resqcapt19
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Pete,
Wall space behind door swings are not included, the measurement starts at the edge of the open door.
The NEC does not exclude the space behind a door. That is wall space that must be counted for the application of 210.52(A)(1).
Don
 
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Old 11-30-03, 04:35 PM
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Actually, as I was typing that I kind of thought "Hey, I don't think that is really in the book" , but I typed it anyway.

It is something we've always done and in all my years have never been failed for it. Now I'm going to have to clarify it with the inspector, just for my own curiosity.
 
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