Solid vs Stranded equivalence

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Old 12-10-03, 12:18 PM
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Solid vs Stranded equivalence

Would an 8 conductor (19 ga) stranded wire be equivalent to an 8 ga solid conductor wire?
 
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Old 12-10-03, 12:35 PM
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8-gauge is 8-gauge, whether stranded or solid. But 8-conductor is not equivalent to 8-gauge. Exactly what are you asking?
 
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Old 12-10-03, 12:47 PM
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you might want to check out this site.
http://www.epelectric.com/apogee/foe_html/fbwss.htm

There are benifits and drawbacks to both stranded and solid wire could you be a little more specific on what your needs are?
 
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Old 12-11-03, 06:20 AM
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A friend is helping build a shop and they want to use #8 wire to connect the electrical feed. He was asking me if an 8 conductor 19 ga stranded wire was equivalent to an 8 ga solid conductor wire.
 
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Old 12-11-03, 07:03 AM
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No they are two different things. 8 ga solid and 8 ga stranded are equivilent but 19 ga is only equivilent to 19 ga wire. I think it would be wise for your friend to do some reading before attemping to do anything electrical, he might be missing some important information or at least be missunderstanding so basic concepts the he should really get a grip on before undertaking a project such as this. There are many good books on the market and it is my feelings that they are essential to DYI'ers safety.
 
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Old 12-11-03, 09:52 AM
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You really need a wiring handbook. A #8 wire is 0.12849 inches in diameter. A #19 wire is 0.035890 inches in diameter. The #8 will be stranded and made up of 7 smaller gauge wires that add up to at least the same cross section as a #8 solid wire (stranded usually has a slightly larger cross section than the nominal solid).
This is not a good place to learn from a mistake.
 
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Old 12-11-03, 10:55 AM
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This isn't a diy project. We were splitting firewood on a Saturday morning and he asked me. I wasn't sure so I thought I'd ask. I'll tell him to ask the electrician doing the job.
 
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Old 12-11-03, 11:22 AM
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He must mean, "Is a stranded conductor made of eight 19 ga wires equivalent to one 8 ga solid wire?" Based on the diameters given by brickeyee, it appears that the answer may be "yes". Why anyone would ask the question that way, I don't know. You don't generally make your own stranded conductors. I'd bet the friend misunderstood what the electrician was saying.
 
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Old 12-11-03, 12:38 PM
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Maybe close, but not close enough. The cross section area is what determines ampacity, and #8 is 16,509 circular mils, and 8 strands of #19 are only 10, 305 circular mils. A #10 wire is 10,383 circular mils. So instead of about a 40 amp capacity, you are just under 30 amps.
Here is a decent wire table:
http://mech296.engr.scu.edu/referenc...GAUGETABLE.htm
 
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Old 12-11-03, 03:09 PM
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brickeyee-

That's what I was looking for - current capacity in stranded vs solid wire. Let's call the poor phrasing of the original question a senior moment, ok?
 
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Old 12-12-03, 11:39 AM
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You have to use the wire at whatever gauge the manufacturer marked on it for house wiring. Internal equipment wiring is a different matter. You are not likely to find a piece of #10 wire in an electric stove. None of the heating elements individually need that much ampacity, and higher temperature insulation is typically used allowing a smaller wire size.
Since wire is normally only available in the discrete sizes, a stranded wire is made up by finding the cross section of the solid wire, dividing by the number of strands, and finding the smallest solid wire that is larger than the required strand cross section. The error is less with higher stranding counts.
 
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