Breaker panel at MAX - Dual breakers an option??


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Old 12-15-03, 08:40 AM
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Breaker panel at MAX - Dual breakers an option??

I remember reading some time ago on this forum about a breaker devise that could actually get two breakers out of one breaker position. The dilemma is that my panel is maxed out, and I would like to get some additional power out to my shed. Possible (3) x 20 amps. Is there such a breaker, and can a take a look at one on the WEB? And is this a good remedy rather than spending time and Money upping service and getting a bigger panel?

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 12-15-03, 08:50 AM
hotarc
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Don't know of a single breaker that gives you three circuits, but there are single breakers that give you two circuits. Check the label inside your panel to see whether or not these "tandem" breakers are permitted for use with your panel.

Your other options, are a panel upgrade, like you said, or a subpanel. Of course adding the subpanel or tandem breakers assumes you have enough power available with the existing service.
 
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Old 12-15-03, 08:56 AM
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Sorry, I was interested in the two possition. So, tandem breakers are what they are called. Do you know where I could take a look at one? So they just fit in the same slot as an existing breaker? So if I have a 20 amp breaker, I can install one of these tandems, and now I have (2) x 20 amp?

What will the panel say if it will not accept one of these tandems?

Thanks for your help! This is very helpful.
 
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Old 12-15-03, 09:15 AM
hotarc
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Tandems, twins, 1/2-size, there are several different names for them.

Go to Home Depot or Lowes website and search the breakers. They both sell the tandem-type breakers.

Yes they will fit into the same slot as a single 15 or 20 amp breaker and they will provide you with two separate 15 or 20 amp circuits. These two circuits will be on the same leg of the service however, so you cannot connect a multi-wire AKA shared neutral circuit to them.

Look at the circuit map on the inside of your panel door. If there are spaces that will accept tandem breakers, the space where you write in the circuit description will typically be divided in half. At least that is how Square D does it. Who is your panel manufacturer?
 
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Old 12-15-03, 09:18 AM
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Who is the manufacturer of your main panel (Siemens, Square-D, Federal, etc.)?

Does it have a model number or anything on it - if so what is it?

Short answer is yes - one tandem breaker is actually 2 half-wide breakers. If you get it in 2X20 configuration then there will be two 20 amp breakers in the panel space currently occupied by 1 full 1" wide breaker.
 
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Old 12-15-03, 09:24 AM
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Thanks again! I will go home tonight and see who the manufacturer is, and research from there. VERY VERY helpful. Thanks!
 
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Old 12-15-03, 09:01 PM
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You are not allowed to run multiple circiuts to a shed. You can run one multiwire circuit or you must use another panel.
 
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Old 12-16-03, 07:19 AM
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What I had in mind was to pull three 20 amp breakers off of the main panel, and install a 60 amp sub panel next to it, and put another 60 Amp sub panel in the shed. Would this work?
 
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Old 12-16-03, 07:29 AM
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You do not need a subpanel at your main panel to install a subpanel at your shed.

You install a breaker at your main panel that is 60 amps, since this what you want at the shed. Then you run wires to the shed where the sub panel is located.

What you need to free up are two adjacent slots at your main panel for your 60 amp breaker that will feed your subpanel in the shed.

However, there are many things to consider here, so you shouldn't guess about it.
 
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Old 12-16-03, 08:10 AM
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Yes that would work well. If you have 6 spaces or less in the shed you do not need a main breaker there. You can get 6 space main lug panels really cheap, under 20$ http://www.homewiringandmore.com/hom...detgarage.html
 
 

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