GFCI wiring


  #1  
Old 12-20-03, 04:16 PM
david_at_housto
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GFCI wiring

I connected a Leviton 8898/8899 GFCI using the instructions found on this website. I only want to protect that specific bathroom sink receptacle. Whenever it pops, however, the lights go out in the bathroom, back bedroom and hallway! Can I wire the GFCI so that only the plugged-in appliance (usually a hair dryer) is affected? I suspect that this added load may be responsible for the popping of the circuit.

The GFCI has two sets of wire holes for both the LINE and LOAD. Nowhere have I found what these second set of holes are used for. Can I use these to accomplish my goal?
Thanks.
 
  #2  
Old 12-20-03, 04:30 PM
J
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David, welcome to the forum.

First, you should understand taht GFCI receptacles do not pop because of overload. They only pop because of current imbalance.

Yes, you can wire a GFCI to protect only itself. Use wire nuts and pigtails to connect all black wires to the "line" side hot screw, and all white wires to the "line" side "white" screw. Don't use the "load" side screws at all.

When in doubt, read all the instructions that come with a GFCI. Most GFCIs come with a full sheet of infomation. I know it's a lot of little print, but there's a lot of good stuff there.

Can you reference the exact page from which you got the instructions you followed? I'd like to see the page you referred to so I understand where you're coming from.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 12-20-03 at 04:41 PM.
  #3  
Old 12-20-03, 04:53 PM
david_at_housto
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That was fast!

http://doityourself.com/electric/gfc...-e2diy0158.htm

is the page on which I found the instructions. I had installed this about six months ago and followed the instructions in the Leviton box. When I went to look for those instructions, I couldn't find them. I couldn't find them on the Leviton website either. That is how I came to the DIY instructions.

I realize that the GFCI is not supposed to be a circuit breaker. However, when my wife plugs in her 1875 watt hairdryer, there is a 50/50 chance it will pop. That is why I posted my original message.

I will follow your instructions. Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 12-20-03, 05:51 PM
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Does the GFI trip or the breaker? It sounds like you are saying the GFI is tripping. If so there is a slight fault in the hair dryer. This may just be something you have to live with. Or you can have the wife get a different hair dryer.

Like John said. Wire only the line side of the GFI, do not use the load holes at all.
You'll have to re-wire the GFI to solve the problem of the other receptacles going out with the GFI.

*edit for typos*
 

Last edited by Speedy Petey; 12-20-03 at 07:17 PM.
  #5  
Old 12-20-03, 06:28 PM
J
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I agree with Speedy. If the hair dryer still trips the GFCI, please consider buying a new hair dryer for Christmas. A properly functioning hair dryer will not trip a GFCI.
 
  #6  
Old 12-21-03, 07:58 PM
david_at_housto
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Thanks to both of you for your advice. After reading John Nelson's instructions, I realized what the second set of holes were for. I simply plugged all the wires into the LINE holes. When I pressed the test button, only the receptacle was affected. The rest of the lights remained on.

Buying a new hair dryer is no big deal.

Thanks again.
 
  #7  
Old 12-23-03, 02:52 PM
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1875 Watts / 125 volts = 15 amperes.

Your wife's hair dryer needs the entire ampacity of a fifteen ampere circuit in order to operate. What size is the Over Current Protective Device (OCPD) that protects that circuit. If the overloaded circuit has a near fault condition, such as a borderline connection or arcing fault, the overload may cause a momentary fault that will trip the GFCI before the overload can trip the breaker. If your rewiring of the GFCI prevents the continuance of the GFCI tripping it may well lead to overload tripping of the OCPD. The cessation of the GFCI tripping would indicate that there is a ground fault down stream of the GFCI. Limiting the GFCI protection to the outlet itself does not clear the ground fault that was causing the GFCI to trip. It would be a good idea to clear that ground fault before it degenerates into an arcing fault that could kindle a fire.
--
Tom
 
  #8  
Old 12-24-03, 09:13 AM
david_at_housto
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Thanks.
This house was built around 1975. It DOES NOT have aluminum wiring.

However, the wires are close to 30 years old. A number of electricians have said that only one company still manufactures the circuit breakers we use, making them twice as expensive as modern ones. In addition, I understand that fire ants are attracted to the insulation of wires and can cause damage.

After purchasing a less powerful hairdryer, we plan to have the wiring checked.

Thanks again. I am very glad I discovered this website. I plan to recommend it to family and friends.
 
 

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