Electrical question


  #1  
Old 12-22-03, 02:33 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Electrical question

I want to install a new circuit in my basement but I cant get a new 1/2 inch conduit to the circuit breaker panel unless I tear out half of my basement ceiling. There is another conduit with a circuit in it already. My question is can I run another 2 wires in this 1/2 inch conduit or is this not allowed by code

thanks in advance
 
  #2  
Old 12-22-03, 03:17 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 8,052
Received 518 Upvotes on 423 Posts
It depends on how many wires are already in the conduit and what size they are.
How many wires are there? Are they #12 or #14. You only need one ground so you won't need to add another one of those.
 
  #3  
Old 12-22-03, 03:39 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
In addition to answering Joe's questions, also tell us what kind of conduit it is. Just saying PVC or metal isn't good enough. See if you can find any writing on the conduit.
 
  #4  
Old 12-22-03, 09:34 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Its a metal conduit with 2 #14 wires in it
 
  #5  
Old 12-22-03, 09:39 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
the conduit has a sticker on it that says EMT I dont knoow if this means anything
 
  #6  
Old 12-22-03, 09:45 PM
hotarc
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Are the fittings threaded or are there set-screw fittings? Rigid conduit will have threaded fittings. EMT or thinwall conduit typically has setscrew or compression-type fittings. The exact type of metal conduit will dictate how many wires can be ran thru it. Like John said, look for writing or stickers, etc. on the runs of conduit to accurately identify its type.
 
  #7  
Old 12-22-03, 09:54 PM
hotarc
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Most likely, yes, you can add two more wires to this conduit. However to be 100% sure, we would need to know the types of wires you are using. If they are THHN, you can add the other 2 wires with no problem. See if you can find any kind of markings on the insulation of the existing wires.
 
  #8  
Old 12-23-03, 07:39 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
As long as you really mean two "wires" and not two "cables", then you are fine. 1/2" EMT can hold up to twelve #14 THHN wires (which is probably what you have).
 
  #9  
Old 12-23-03, 09:16 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The wires are THHN. Im now a little confused. Wires/Cables sounds like the same to me please explain
 
  #10  
Old 12-23-03, 09:35 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Seattle
Posts: 179
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
A cable consists of two or more wires.
i.e. A 12/2 with ground romex cable consists of three wires; a hot (black), neutral (white), and ground (bare or green).
 
  #11  
Old 12-24-03, 06:08 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
no its just 2 wires in the conduit, one white and one black. Is it ok to run 2 more
 
  #12  
Old 12-24-03, 07:57 PM
hotarc
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Yes
 
  #13  
Old 12-24-03, 11:43 PM
LBruce
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I would disconnect the existing circuit that has the two wires in the conduit and use one of them as a pull wire to pull in the other circuit. I would pull 4 wires; one to replace the one you are pulling with and three for the new circuit. The new circuit should consist of a black for hot, a white for the neutral and a green for the ground. I would also consider pulling an additional green-ground for the circuit that is already in the EMT.
Have someone help you when you pull these new wires to make sure that the insulation is not cut or scratched as you pull into the conduit. I would also consider using #12 THHN wire.
Hope this helps - good luck.
 
  #14  
Old 12-25-03, 09:33 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Illinios
Posts: 242
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Don't worry about adding a green grounding wire to the conduit. The conduit itself has been tested by UL labs as a grounding means, the original licensed electrician that built the house used it as a grounding means, and the electricial inspector that ok'ed the original install found it acceptable. The space left by not using it can be used in the future for more circuits
 
  #15  
Old 12-25-03, 10:23 AM
Rlfrazee
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Mike I think Lbruce is concerned about the electrical continuity of EMT i.e. subject to being dislodged due to set screw and compression construction thereby losing grounding path. In my area commercial installations require ground wire pulled with all EMT contruction. Realize this is residential but the concern is well noted....RL
 
  #16  
Old 12-25-03, 08:42 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 32
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the help looks like Ill knock it out this weekend
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: