"Circuit Breaker" Figure Amps or What?


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Old 12-22-03, 05:27 PM
SteverZ
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Question "Circuit Breaker" Figure Amps or What?

I have a room on the second floor, that I believe, according to the 15 on the black switch on the "Circuit Breaker box" in the garage, means 15 amps. Is this correct?

My wife is building a dental lab in that second floor room, and if she were to power up everything at once (which would be rare), but if she did, the total amps would be 60.

So the question here is, is this basic math on this one, meaning, the room would be 45 amps short (60-15=45) correct? Or am I looking at this one totally wrong? Also, would the change to more power simply be done at the box?

Some education and understanding would be helpful. NOTE: I would get an electrician to do the work, but I just want to better understand. THANKS.
 
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Old 12-22-03, 05:39 PM
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Welllllll, what kind of dental lab? If this is patient care you are in another whole rhealm.

You basically are figuring it wrong. You need to look at each load separately. You really don't just add up the amps. Each circuit needs to be sized according to the load it will serve. Most labs will have dedicated circuits for each piece of equipment or smaller loads will share circuits.

Make sure you tell your electrician exactly what the purpose of this lab will be.
 
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Old 12-22-03, 05:44 PM
J
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Yes, the "15" on the breaker means 15 amps.

And yes, if she did power up everything at once, you would be 45 amps short.

You need some serious electrical work. The change cannot simply be done at the box. There will need to be some new wiring between the box and the room, and some new breakers in the box.

Talk through this with your electrician. Given that this is a commercial enterprise, it is likely that you as the homeowner would not be allowed to do this work yourself, even if you feel qualified. So it's good that you plan to have this professionally done.
 
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Old 12-22-03, 05:55 PM
SteverZ
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The lab in question is a Prosthetic Dental Lab, so no, it's not a dental office and she is not a dentist. This labs makes the crowns and bridges that go in ones' mouth.

The equipment in general has lots of small amperage, ex: 0.2, 0.25, 1.7, 4.8, 0.95, 0.5 ... then there are only a couple larger pieces of equipment at 10.0 , 14.5, 4.8, etc.

There are quite a few extra circuits in the box including several 50A breakers that aren't being used. I built this house new only three years ago, so everything is very up-to-date.
 
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Old 12-22-03, 07:44 PM
J
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Being up to date for residential purposes means nothing when used for non-residental activities. Extra circuits in the box do you no good unless those circuits deliver power to where you need it. Except in unusual circumstances, you cannot use more than a 20-amp circuit for connecting cord-and-plug appliances.

I'd say you're in pretty good shape. A discussion with the electrician should quickly determine how many new circuits you need, and it's a relatively straight-forward process to put them in.
 
 

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