rough electrical inspection


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Old 12-29-03, 01:04 PM
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rough electrical inspection

[SIZE=3]rough electrical inspection[/SIZE]

When the township asked to do a "rough electrical inspection" , what exactly are they looking for?. Do it I need to put in the receptacle but not connect to it and leave out a certain amount of electrical lines, -or- just put in the box and not receptacles and runs line to box only etc...? Can anyone give me insight please

Also the same for lighting and switches..what are they looking for or what do i need to do. Thanks a bunch
 
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Old 12-29-03, 01:18 PM
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The simplest solution is to ask them what they will be looking for. In general, they will want to inspect anything that can no longer be seen when the job is finished. Since receptacles can easily be inspected later, they are not needed for the rough inspection (and are generally annoying to have installed when you do the drywall).

They are looking for compliance with hundreds of electrical codes. It is impossible to list them all here. Common mistakes involve insufficient cable stapling (need every 4.5' and within 8" of a box), insufficient length of cable left in the box (need at least six inches), bored holes too close to the edge of a stud without a nailing plate (1.25"), insufficient number or placement of receptacles, cable sheathing damage during installation, improper placement of smoke detector outlets, etc (maybe other can add more).

All of your boxes should be mounted, and all of your cable run. You should make as many connections as you can without the devices. Connect all grounding wires with a green wire nut and leave the pigtail for the device. Connect any neutral wires that will not be connected to the device.

Make sure that none of your wiring is covered up and unavailable for inspection. This means, for example, that the insulation should not be yet in place.
 
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Old 12-29-03, 04:37 PM
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roughelectrical inspection

[SIZE=3]Rough electrical inspection[/SIZE]

Ok I got the basic idea. It sounds to me as if you are saying "hook-up receptacle & switches but do not hook-up any to anylighting, fan etc... ". (but, do hoook-up grounds for any devices)

I Do however forgot to asked 2 other things (I hope this is the last 2). First hooking up my receptacles, I am running 20 amp circuit with 12 gage wires to my new additon room. Since this is a living room and no appliances are running off these receptacles, can I run 8 receptacles and 1 GFI (for outside) off from this 1 circuit.

Secondly, I am also planing on running 1 other circuit for 3 recessed lightings and 1 fan. i'm assuming I can do that as well while using 20 amp circuit ofcourse and 12 gage wires?.

Thanks so much.
 
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Old 12-29-03, 04:48 PM
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It sounds to me as if you are saying "hook-up receptacle & switches but do not hook-up any to any lighting, fan etc
I think you misinterpreted. My intent was to say not to hook up any of these things.
Since receptacles can easily be inspected later, they are not needed for the rough inspection (and are generally annoying to have installed when you do the drywall).
Can I run 8 receptacles and 1 GFI (for outside) off from this 1 circuit?
Yes.

I am also planing on running 1 other circuit for 3 recessed lightings and 1 fan. I'm assuming I can do that as well while using 20 amp circuit of course and 12 gauge wires?.
Yes.
 
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Old 12-29-03, 05:10 PM
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rough electrical inspection

[SIZE=3]rough electrical inspection[/SIZE]

It took a little bit but I think I finally understand. I would asked our local township inspectors but its very difficult to contact them. They are never in their office or returned any of my callssss. I also know that they are very busy, so thats why I am here asking everyone for help. I appreciate all your help and will post a picture of my finished room when completed. Thank you again.

note: I may have more questions later, hope you don't mind
 
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Old 12-29-03, 06:06 PM
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Ask the office staff what time the inspectors are in the office. Usually they take calls for a half hour or so first thing in the morning before they go out to do the inspections.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 12:00 PM
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MAY BE AN ELECTRICAL BOO BOO (HELP PLEASE)

[SIZE=3]MAY BE AN ELECTRICAL BOO BOO (HELP PLEASE)[/SIZE]

When I ran my recessed lights for the cathedral ceiling, instead of running it through the wall stud and up the celing, I ran the wires through the ceiling joistses. I drilled a 5/8" through all the celing joists an aprroximately 1' away from the bird mouth area. Is this lega?

If its legal, can i drill anymore to run more wires?. I hope the answer is "yes" because I'm really doubting my knowledge at this point. note: I am almost finsihed with running all wires and ready for rough inspection.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 12:40 PM
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Another thing that the inspector will be looking for is "conductor fill". You cannot put too many conductors into a box.

Not sure what the bird mouth area is, but the rule with boring through ceiling joists is not to bore any holes through the middle third of a span.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 03:22 PM
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ELECTRICAL BOO BOO

Thanks for the advice. I'm very much appreciated.

The "bird mouth area" is the notched that seats above the top plate.
wen you say "the middle third" of the joist; I'm assuming you are refering to the central part of the span. Since I'm drilling through the end of the span near the wall, I'm assuming it's ok?
 
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Old 12-31-03, 04:19 PM
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The rules for notching and drilling framing members is not an electrical code, but a building code. As far as electrical is concerned, the code only says that if the hole is closer than 1.25" from the edge of the framing member, you must install a nailing plate to protect it from getting hit by a nail.

There are many web sites with the rules for notching and boring. Here is one. In general, when drilling any structural member, it is best to drill dead center across the width of the member. This generally results in the least weakening of the member.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 12-31-03 at 04:40 PM.
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Old 12-31-03, 06:49 PM
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It will not be that bad, I got a copy of the new NEC at the library and just followed it. Once you familiar with the codes its pretty simple. Only thing he busted me on was the green wire nuts.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 06:57 PM
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I got a copy of the new NEC at the library and just followed it


Man, if it were only that easy!
 
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Old 12-31-03, 11:31 PM
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The problem with the NEC is that it isn't very well cross referenced. So unless you have read and understand all 750 pages of the NEC, you really cannot just read one section and follow that. One very annoying and frustrating problem with the NEC is that what one section seems to give, another section takes away.
 
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Old 01-01-04, 08:12 AM
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electrical boo boo

Well, what's done is done. I think it should be ok (hopefully). My inspection is set up for next week. I'll find out exactly what's need to be changed. I'm a bit anxious to be over-with. I will report back if there's any mishap. Thanks for all your advice
 
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Old 01-03-04, 04:35 PM
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Uh Oh more electrical question(s) to ask

[SIZE=3]Uh Oh more electrical question(s) to ask[/SIZE]

I have an existing 30 amp circuit with 10 gage wires that was used for an old regrigerator. I want to run my garbage disposal using this circuit, but also run 2 recepacles using this old circuit as well. Can I do that?. If I can, can I also run my washing machine off this circuit?
note: the old refrigerator does not exist any more so its an open circuit.
 
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Old 01-03-04, 06:11 PM
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It would be a rare refrigerator indeed that runs on a 30-amp circuit. Unless this is some kind of weird institutional refrigerator, it should be on no more than a 20-amp circuit. The same is true of a garbage disposal.

Washing machines cannot share power with anything other than other laundry area receptacles.

I am now very concerned. The questions you just asked indicate that you may not be aware of very basic residential wiring codes. I recommend the $5.95 green paperback, "Wiring Simplified", available in the electrical aisle at Home Depot. Read it cover to cover.
 
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Old 01-03-04, 08:30 PM
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The previous owner of this home had an open 30 amp circuit with an attached receptacle. What it was used for I'm not sure. My assumpton was it had to be used for an appliance or something. The only thing I can think of was an old freezer or Electric stove since it's in the basement and at a very paculiar location. With that in mind, since this 30 amp circuit were used in the past, I just thought I must have missed something and better make sure with the pros. If it can be done once, I thought it can be done again. Note: Its defintely a 30 amp circuit

Currently my garbage disposal and washing machine are on separate circuit running 20 amps and using 12 gage wire. it's running running just fine I might add . I just thought I can post a question to make sure since I'm not a professional, and if the answers helps allevates my knowledge, It's better yet. I appreciate your concern, but basic books of wiring is not necessary. i Appreciate a good sugesstion anyway

Based on your expertised, what do you think the 30 amp were used for? (curious)
 
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Old 01-03-04, 09:20 PM
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^^ Is this 30 amp circuit 120 volts or 240? If it was 240 then maybe a clothes dryer or electric heater or some sort. What type of receptacle is it?

If it is 120V, then it probably just somebody who didn't know what the heck they were doing. This happens quite a bit when homeowners try to do their own electric work. And like John Nelson says, the basement is like a playground for the untrained!
 
 

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