240V plug incorrect for heater-help!


  #1  
Old 12-31-03, 01:00 PM
Rockiness
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240V plug incorrect for heater-help!

I purchased a QMark portable shop/garage heater [PH5HWAB] with its special power cord PHCS1B. The female receptacle I have is an L6 20P [twist type] and the male plug on the cord is the 2 parallel prong type. Can I simply cut off the plug and splice on the properly rated "twist-type" plug? I cannot/will not switch the outlet ...
 
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Old 12-31-03, 01:13 PM
M
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I'm confused. You say your receptacle is an L6-20P? That would be the matching plug. Your receptacle should be an L6-20R. There is no problem switching a 6-20P to an L6-20P. It sounds like you have a 6-15P. You should either change your receptacle to a 6-15R or change your breaker to a DP 15A (I'm assuming it's a DP 20A) to be correct, but changing the 6-15P to an L6-20P shouldn't cause any problems.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 02:12 PM
Rockiness
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further explanation

I am sorry for the lack of specifics. For the PH5HWAC unit heater for the garage I bought the PHCS1B power cord kit. It comes with a 30 amp 250V NEMA #6-30R [the plug has 2 parallel 'rectangular' poles with a round ground]. My receptacle is an L6-20R configured as a twist type [ the 2 poles are more more 'circular or arch' ] . I can NOT switch the receptacles - there is a proper 240 v 40 amp breaker subpanel.
Can I cut off the existing plug and attach an L6 -30P plug ??
 
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Old 12-31-03, 02:24 PM
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Your heater requires a 240V 30A circuit and your existing receptacle is a 240V 20A. You need to run a larger circuit.
 
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Old 12-31-03, 05:18 PM
Rockiness
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I have a subpanel with 2 double-20's , thus 40 amps per receptacle ...and 2 outlets -
 
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Old 12-31-03, 05:25 PM
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You cannot get 30 amps from any breaker that says "20" on it. A double-pole 20-amp breaker provides only 20 amps, not 40 amps. As stated earlier, you need a double-pole 30-amp breaker with 10-gauge wire. This means that nothing you currently have is applicable to what you need. You need to start from scratch.
 
 

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