Running outside ciruit to a storage shed


  #1  
Old 01-03-04, 04:13 PM
BuickGN
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Running outside ciruit to a storage shed

I want to run a circuit to an outside shed about 50 ft from my house. Basically all I want to do is have a light in the shed, one receptacle and a couple of floodlights attached to the shed to light up my back yard.

In the future I want to also get one of those Intex inflatable pools that use a small 1/2 HP 120v filter pump.

Was thinking about running a 20A circuit thru conduit that I already have buried about 18" underground using 3C/12 cable. I know the circuit must be GFI protected and I will be using a GFI breaker at the main panel to satisfy that requirement.

I am going to use all weather tight PVC connectors to run thru the wall of the hose to the outside and also into the shed.

What am I missing? Is it OK to have that pool filter on the same circuit? This type of pool is considered a temporary one that is taken down at the end of the season.
 
  #2  
Old 01-03-04, 07:16 PM
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What size is the conduit?
You do not need GFCI protection of the circuit if it is in conduit with an 18" depth of bury.
Do not pull cable into the conduit. It will add cost and be hard to pull. Individual THWN conductors will do the job just fine. Any given building may only be supplied by a single circuit whether a feeder or a branch circuit. A multiwire branch circuit only counts as a single circuit but it provides twice the power of a two wire branch circuit. You run a black, red white and green. You install the black and the red on two separate single pole breakers that are positioned in the panel so that there is a voltage difference between them. In most homes this voltage would be 240 volts. Given the fifty foot exterior run plus the run to the panel and the planned motor load let me suggest number ten American Wire Gauge for your conductor sizing.
Since you plan to power a pool filter from this circuit I suggest you run an insulated rather than a bare Equipment Grounding Conductor with the circuit conductors and that it be the same size as the circuit conductors.
--
Tom
 
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Old 01-03-04, 07:36 PM
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I kind of need to clarify a little.
You do need GFI protection at the shed. The conductors do not need to be GFI protected, a GFI receptacle at the shed is fine. The lighting does not need protection, just any receptacles.

Definitely run conductors, not cable in the conduit. I really don't see a need for #10 wire for only 50' and the pump you are considering is a minimal draw. A #12, 20 amp multi-wire circuit is a good idea.
Speaking of the pool. A storable pool does not need to follow the stringent rules of a permanent pool. A GFI receptacle is fine but you will need to use an "in use" cover for it if the GFI is exposed to weather.
 
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Old 01-03-04, 07:55 PM
R
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Another item to keep in mind, depending on where you live, the type of pool you are considering may require a permit, an inspection and a fence.

This may sound ludicrous for a temporary pool, but these items may be required or may be desired. Where I live (upstate NY) they have fined people for putting in a pool without a permit and for not having the required fence. All because a child died, and it wasn't her pool. I'd hate to be that homeowner. May as well turn over every paycheck from now on directly to the victim's family.
 
  #5  
Old 01-04-04, 11:25 AM
BuickGN
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Planning on a fence around the pool for sure! Not many kids in my neighborhood but you can't be too safe. Thanks for the advice.

Ended up pulling a 3/C #12 cable thru the 3/4" conduit I had already buried and it came thru with ease. No problem there. Would it just be easier to use a GFI breaker instead of receptacles? Have to add a breaker for the circuit while I am in the panel anyway.

I do have a question on my panel while I am here but will post that separately. Thanks.
 
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Old 01-04-04, 11:46 AM
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The drawback to a breaker at the house is that if it trips, you have to go back to the house to the panel to reset. it. If an outlet GFCI trips you just go to the outlet and reset it. A GFCI ouitlet is much cheaper than a GFCI breaker, too.
 
  #7  
Old 01-05-04, 05:23 PM
BuickGN
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Got everything installed and DID end up using a GFI breaker in the panel. Everything worked out fine.
 
 

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