no power on circuit


  #1  
Old 01-13-04, 05:00 AM
notagenius
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
no power on circuit

I am puting in a portable tub in the basement. It was recommend to put in a GFCI outlet where it will plug in. During install I discovered that the old metal box was too small for the new GFCI. So, I put in a plastic box and mounted it to the stud on the other side of the wall. Other side of the wall is unfinished part of basement.
For some dumb reason I was working live at the time and when I was pulling the wires out of the old metal box sparks flew.(I am undamaged). After I turned the power off, I continued with the install of the new GFCI using the screws, not backstabs.

Now, I have no power at all on this circuit. I traced the line from my main box and there are four outlets and two lights on the circuit.
The new GFCI is in the middle. The breaker is OK. Did I arc or short this whole circuit? How can I tell? What should I do?
Thanks for your help.
 
  #2  
Old 01-13-04, 05:33 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,246
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Did you wire the GFCI properly? A GFCI has input (line) and output (load) connections. If you mix these up the GFCI will not work, nor will other items after this on the circuit.

Is the breaker tripped? Did you turn the breaker off and then on? Do outlets before the GFCI work?
 
  #3  
Old 01-13-04, 06:07 AM
notagenius
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I have double checked the GFCI wiring, it is correct. I have tripped the breaker back and forth.IT is OK. Nothing on the circuit has power. Maybe in my zeal to remove the old metal box and get some slack in the wires to make it eaiser to work I pulled a connection loose upstream, I'll check this as well.
 
  #4  
Old 01-13-04, 07:37 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Possibilities:

(1) You fried the GFCI. This theory only makes sense if the GFCI is the first thing on the circuit. It is easily tested with a voltmeter or a circuit tester. Simply remove the GFCI and test for voltage on the line side cable.

(2) Your short caused a weak connection to open up. This could be a failed backstab connection anywhere on the circuit. You can narrow the search by figuring out whether the hot or the neutral is the open wire. A voltmeter, circuit tester, or outlet tester will determine this.
 
  #5  
Old 01-13-04, 06:44 PM
notagenius
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
John, I appreciate your respnse. So you know the circuit goes like this...outlet, outlet(where I am putting the new GFCI), outlet, light, outlet and light.I do have a neon tester, how exactly do I do suggestion #2 for each??Testing for hot as you say. Thanks.
 
  #6  
Old 01-14-04, 07:41 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I recommend you spend $8 on an outlet tester at Home Depot. Plug it into each non-working outlet and tell us what the lights tell you.
 
  #7  
Old 01-17-04, 06:45 AM
notagenius
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Gentlemen, Thanks. I got a voltmeter and determined that the short was on the first outlet, changed it out for new and voila... I have power again. Thanks again so much for your expertise.

You may hearing from me again when my next challenge will installing a ceiling fan. Don't expect it to be too difficult though, I'll just be replacing an old one.

Scott
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: