Grounding receptacles


  #1  
Old 01-14-04, 01:01 AM
dennist 1
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Thumbs down Grounding receptacles

We had some elec work done here. the electrician was highly recommended by the inspector which is a neighbor of ours. well he came in re did most of the wiring in our basment, well he was putting up to code. Any way he replaced most of the of the old bx cable with the cloth insulation. he reinstalled conduit . looks great. he even went up in the attic and replaced some wiring up there. I was in the army when all this went on so I didnt watch him do this work, and im no pro but I have had my share in shocks and jolts. He didnt replace any of the wiring going up the wall feeding any of the receptacle boxes and or switches/fixtures. I noticed that the main box is grounded to my washer water line. Now I did test some of the old outlets and they are not properly grounded according to the analyzer. Some had a 3 prong receptacle on it but when I looked at them there was a ground wire attached to the ground screw and the other end was attached to the receptacle screw and those passed. I dont like that at all I put tape on those so no one plugs anything in. Was his grounding method correct? Also maybe I got loose connectors on my j boxes cause he did hook up some old stuff to the new J boxes . Would the ground carry through? Let me know , Im sure alot of ? might pop up for you guys so just tell me what you think .If I have to pull that old stuff out of the wall whats the best way of doing it?
 
  #2  
Old 01-14-04, 06:16 AM
J
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Are you saying the ground screw on the receptacle was jumped to the silver/neutral screw? That is definitely wrong and should be removed. If you can't install a proper ground a GFCI receptacle is an acceptable repair.
 
  #3  
Old 01-14-04, 08:01 AM
M
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If he did indeed jumper the ground to the neutral then you need to inform the "inspector" that recommended him. That is a sign of shoddy, short-cut, code violation work and would be indicative of his level of professionalism.

However, if he did, I would think that the receptacle analyzer would indicate a "properly" grounded outlet. Did you mean to say that the green ground screw on the receptacle was jumpered to the metal receptacle box? If so, unless there is a ground path back to the panel from the box (through a wire or armored cable sheath), that method wouldn't do any good.
 
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Old 01-14-04, 08:39 AM
J
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A lot of issues have been raised here, but the details are a bit sketchy. There could be a number of code and safety violations here, or it could be that everything is fine.

Issues:[list=1][*]Is the panel properly grounded? This depends on where that washing machine water line is relative to where the water supply enters your house. It also depends on whether or not the service pipe underground is metal or PVC. And it depends on whether or not there are grounding rods.[*]Are ungrounded 3-prong receptacles okay? This depends on whether or not you have correctly determined that they are ungrounded, and whether or not they are GFCI protected.[*]Is there an illegal bootleg ground? This depends on exactly what you meant by, "a ground wire attached to the ground screw and the other end was attached to the receptacle screw." What exactly is "the receptacle screw"?[/list=1]
 
  #5  
Old 01-14-04, 01:06 PM
dennist 1
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Thanks for the replies guys,It appears that there is only a few outlets that have the open ground ground problem. There is a couple of outlets that that are only 2 prong. Now as someone stated above Did you mean to say that the green ground screw on the receptacle was jumpered to the metal receptacle box? Well that is correct. Now I would believe that the service is properly grounded cause most of the the other outlets appear to be using the armored cable as the return ground path back to the service. all of those wires do look new its the outlets with the cloth insulation that appear to be open ground .
 
  #6  
Old 01-14-04, 01:14 PM
dennist 1
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What would be the best way to properly ground those remaing outlets .
 
  #7  
Old 01-14-04, 01:31 PM
M
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To "properly" ground the outlets, you need to rewire them with 3-wire cable. The preferred method is to install GFI protection. That way you won't have a "ground", but you will have a receptacle for a 3-prong plug that is safe for the user.
 
  #8  
Old 01-14-04, 01:38 PM
R
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The other appropriate way to ground an ungrounded outlet is to run a green wire (of the appropriate gauge) from the outlet all the way back to the panel and connect it to the ground bar.
 
  #9  
Old 01-14-04, 01:51 PM
J
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The only way to actually ground the outlet is to do what Bob says. What mcjunk says makes it legal, but as he said, does not make it grounded. Whether or not you actually need grounding depends on what you use that receptacle for. Most of the equipment in your house doesn't even make use of the grounding connection.
 
  #10  
Old 01-14-04, 01:56 PM
dennist 1
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is the sheath that is ran with the 2 wire creating a ground path back through the newer conduit and then to the main ??because those are fine.
 
  #11  
Old 01-14-04, 01:58 PM
dennist 1
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I really dont need grounding but I would at least want to get rid of the the remaining outlets with the 2 prong
 
 

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