GFCI and 220 outlets


  #1  
Old 01-15-04, 08:29 PM
jovantovich
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GFCI and 220 outlets

Hello,

I have a few quick questions. I ran wire to remodel my kitchen. I have a question on where I need to put the GFCI in this situation. I think I messed up something while running wire, but am wondering if there is an alternative. I ran my homerum from circuit breaker to my garbage disposal outlet box under the sink. I then ran a wire from there to the switch. However, I need to know if there is a way to wire a gfci outlet next to the switch under the configuration I stated. I think there is, but does my garbage disposal outlet need to be gfci or can I have it by the switch?

Also quickly, what is the "name" of the outlet I need in order to plug my stove in. I ran 8/3 from 50 amp/220. Also, what is the "name" of the outlet I need to wire for my 20 amp/220 dryer? Are they the same? Any help here would be great!! Thank you so much!
 
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Old 01-15-04, 09:15 PM
J
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The cabling you describe requires a switch loop. Since you didn't ask how to make the switch control the receptacle, I'll assume that you already know how to wire a switch loop.

You cannot put a receptacle next to the switch using the wiring at the switch for two reasons:[list=1][*]Code prohibits the garbage disposal from being on the same circuit as a receptacle serving the countertop.[*]You can't wire a receptacle from a switch loop anyway without 12/3 wire.[/list=1]So just don't.

The switched receptacle under the sink serving the garbage disposal does not require GFCI protection.

8/3 isn't enough for a 50-amp circuit. It's only enough for a smaller 40-amp circuit. You should have used 6/3.

For a 50-amp range, you need a 50-amp 240-volt receptacle. It's often sold as simply a 4-wire 50-amp range receptacle. The dryer receptacle is not the same. Most dryers are 30 amps, not 20 amps. If the receptacle is going on new wiring (10/3), then you need a 4-wire 30-amp dryer receptacle. If the dryer receptacle is going on old wiring (10/2), you will need a 3-wire 30-amp dryer receptacle. The cord to the dryer, and how it is attached to the dryer, varies depending on the receptacle.

Be sure you know what you are doing. This is deadly stuff.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 09:15 PM
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John, I'd like to ask how you interpret 310.16 & 110.14 .

I usually run #8 to ranges since most range receptacles are rated for 75*c.

#8 THHN found in NM is rated for 90*c and we use the 75* column due to the rating of the receptacle. #8 @ 75*C is 50 amps.

How do you feel about this?
 
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Old 01-17-04, 10:11 PM
J
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I think both 310.16 and 110.14 contain far too much information for me to know precisely what you are referring to.

However, when it comes to the ampacity of NM cable, article 334.80 is huge. This article is incredibly important when using NM.

Although you and I know that NM is normally constructed using THHN-like wire, this wire is not formally THHN and is not listed as THHN. Therefore, none of the properties of THHN can be attributed to NM.
 
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Old 01-17-04, 10:15 PM
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Since it changed I was under the impression it was THHN just not labeled individually.

Either way, you are actually correct in using the 60*c column.
 
 

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