Electrical Receptacles in Kitchen Counter Backsplash


  #1  
Old 01-19-04, 11:42 AM
Strooni
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Electrical Receptacles in Kitchen Counter Backsplash

I am designing a 36" tall kitchen island which will have a sink and only a 6" high backsplash so that I can put another counter top on it at the 42" level for some bar stools. I would like to put my small appliance receptacles along the countertop within this 6" space; is there a minimum requirement how high off the counter top surface that receptacles must be placed?

Thanks in advance-
Mark
 
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Old 01-19-04, 12:42 PM
J
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No minimum. Only a 20" maximum. GFCI protection required of course.
 
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Old 01-19-04, 04:49 PM
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Nope, no min. This is one of the few places at a kitchen counter with no dimension. Except for face up not being alowed.
 
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Old 01-19-04, 05:44 PM
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John-

Do you know of any exceptions to the 20" rule for receptacles? I'm working with a customer to build a home office and they want a receptacle 6"-8" above the desk top. The rationale is that if it's OK to put a plug strip on a desk or the on the wall above the desk top, why not a receptacle?

Any thoughts?
 
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Old 01-19-04, 06:21 PM
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Dave, the 20" maximum rule only applies to kitchens. This is usually never a problem since most upper cabinets are only 18" above the counter top.
A home office desk has no code like this unless it's in the kitchen.
The standard 6/12 wall spacing rule applies along with the 5' 6" height rule.
 
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Old 01-19-04, 08:06 PM
J
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Dave, your question illustrates a common a problem with advice forums like this one. I have two choices when answering questions: (1) I can give all the rules for all situations everywhere, or (2) I can answer the question for the person who asked. I usually choose the second approach because it is most useful to the person who asked the question.

However, I often get mail from people who point out that somebody might misinterpret my answer by not fully understanding the context in which it was given. I acknowledge this risk. But the alternative is to provide such a lengthy answer that the person who asked the question may not be able to figure out what part of it applies to him.

So a warning to all readers: If you don't have exactly the same situation in every detail to the person who asked the question, then the answer may not apply to you.

I often put receptacles above desk height when I know where the desk is going to be ahead of time. It's a great idea.
 
 

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