100amp to 200amp service


  #1  
Old 01-22-04, 09:39 PM
JoeE
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100amp to 200amp service

Hi Everyone,
I have 100 amp service currently in my home with no problems. We are looking to do some remodeling in the kitchen and also adding a hot tub in the back yard. My question is is 200 amp service needed for this transition, the kitchen will have a electric cooktop and a electric in the wall oven. I know i need a 220 line to the deck for the tub but not sure of the requirements for the new cooktop and oven ( we had gas in the last and current local requirements do not allow anything biggerthan 27" oven in the wall.....and i guess another question would be is it expensive converting to 200 amp service.....thanks everyone

Joe
 
  #2  
Old 01-23-04, 07:48 AM
J
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If you have an electrician for this job, he/she will do a "demand load" calculation to answer this question. If you'd like us to do a rough one for you, then answer these questions. Each question should be answered according to what will be true after the remodeling is complete.[list=1][*]How many square feet will your house be?[*]Gas or electric home heat? If electric, how many KW?[*]Gas or electric water heat? If electric, how many water heaters?[*]Gas or electric clothes drying? If electric, how many dryers?[*]Gas or electric cooking? If electric, how many appliances, not counting microwaves (range, oven, etc)?[*]How many kitchens?[*]How many refrigerators?[*]How many garbage disposals?[*]How many dishwashers?[*]How many microwaves?[*]How many KW is the heating in your hot tub?[*]How many jacuzzi bathroom tubs?[*]How many tons of air conditioning, if any?[*]Welder?[*]Kiln?[*]Swimming pool?[/list=1]The conversion from 100-amp to 200-amp will be about $1500, plus or minus $500 depending on other factors.
 
  #3  
Old 01-23-04, 08:18 AM
JoeE
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John,
Thanx for your reply. I am having a electrician come in and I will have him calculate the demand...It helps to have a general idea of some of the ins and outs of the job. That way it seems that I actually might know what I am talking about......lol

Joe
 
  #4  
Old 01-23-04, 09:29 AM
M
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An important factor in determining how much the service change will cost is how your existing service is installed. If a new 200A panel / meter base can be installed and easily connected to your existing 100A panel (making it a subpanel), then the job can be done relatively cheaply. If you have to have the 200A panel installed in place of the 100A panel it will cost more and require more down time.
 
  #5  
Old 01-23-04, 10:17 AM
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Another point

It probably doesn't apply but depending on where you live and what kind of power lines are coming in from the power lines. If when the 100 amp panel was installed they only used lines suitable for 100 amps then the cable all the way to the power lines may have to be replaced, depending on if this is underground or above ground and how long a run this is it can be very expensive.
However your electrician should tell you if this is a problem when he comes to look at the place.

Just another expense that you might want to know ahead of time
 
 

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