Running power to a shed


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Old 01-25-04, 09:15 PM
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Running power to a shed

I would like to run power to my shed, which is about 40ft from the meter. Home depot has a 125-amp box with a 125-amp main and 5 20-amp breakers for only $39, which I would like to use. I was planning on using #2 wire and a #8 ground and run it to the meter. Do I need to separate the ground and neutral or should they be tied together. Do I need to add a ground rod. Will this work?
 
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Old 01-25-04, 09:23 PM
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This is a huge amount of power for a shed, and is probably extreme overkill unless you have a large welder or a kiln or two.

There are a million very important details you need to know, but I'll start by answering your questions directly.

Do I need to separate the ground and neutral?
A neutral with no equipment grounding conductor is okay in some limited situations. A neutral plus an equipment grounding conductor is always okay. I strongly suggest the latter, whether it is required or not.

Should they be tied together?
If you run separate neutral and equipment grounding, they must be tied together at the house, and must not be tied together at the shed.

Do I need to add a ground rod?
Yes.

Will this work?
If you get the million other details right.
 
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Old 01-25-04, 10:00 PM
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I plan on using a welder. I first thought of running a 6/3 off of a 60 amp breaker in the mian box but for a little more money I can have some over kill for a larger welder and air compressor and a small air conditioner.
 
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Old 01-25-04, 11:06 PM
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And remember, you cant go to the meter, well you can if the main entrance panel is there. The wiring from panels to weldeing machines is slightly unusual. For close runs a 10 wire with a 50A preaker is fine for most units you are likely to encounter for home use. 8 wire if the runs get long. Personally I always run at least 1 size heavier that whats allowed in the manual. Something like a kiln needs number 6 wire on a 50 but these machines dont. Its always good to mention what model you have.
 
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Old 01-26-04, 11:16 AM
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Why can't I run the wire directly to the meter connection? The house main panel is on the other side of the wall from the meter.
 
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Old 01-26-04, 11:34 AM
G-Dawg
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Why can't I run the wire directly to the meter connection? The house main panel is on the other side of the wall from the meter
If it's anything like VA Power they won't let you. But they will be delighted to put a meter on your shed though. (Costs to much overall)
 
  #7  
Old 01-26-04, 02:58 PM
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Thats a good reason.
 
 

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