Running a wire thru ceiling


  #1  
Old 03-18-04, 11:44 AM
rdknott
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Running a wire thru ceiling

I am running wire from a wall switch up the wall to install a "high hat" in the center of the hallway. I am sure there is a stud at the top of the wall.

How do I make the hole in the stud without tearing up existing drywall?

The "high hat" is about 2 feet from the stud.

Thanks,

Dick
 
  #2  
Old 03-18-04, 12:23 PM
J
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If there is an attic above you can work from there. If there is a floor above then you will need to cut a hole in the drywall and patch it unless you can reach in from the hole for the hi hat and drill down into the top plate.
 
  #3  
Old 03-18-04, 02:00 PM
J
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Invisible drywall patching is a great skill to have. Once you've mastered it, projects such as this become so much simpler. It's a skill (really more of an art) that can be learned my almost anybody. Read a few good books on drywalling.

Of course, if there is a feasible way to avoid drywall damage, that's even better. But it may not be worth going to great lengths to avoid it.
 
  #4  
Old 03-18-04, 06:48 PM
rdknott
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High Hat Installed! But!!!

Got the high hat installed. Had to do a little patching but not much. Looks good.

New problem, The wall plug recepticle I ran the wire from, resulted in an enlarged hole for the electrical box. Now I am having trouble getting the box to adhere to the drywall. Hole is too big.

I am using a blue wing nut box and it doesn't attach to the drywall because the hole is too big.

Suggestions please

Thanks,

Dick
 
  #5  
Old 03-18-04, 09:44 PM
hotarc
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You could try looking for a different "old-work" box. I've found those blue ones aren't too good. The grey ones with the metal wings are much better, IMO. Of course I'm not sure how much bigger your hole is than the box will accomodate, but if it is only off by a little, a different box might do the trick.

Another option is to use a metal box and screw thru the side into the stud. Or, use a metal box with those F-clamps, aka "Madison hold-its".

Or, make the hole a lot larger and use a regular nail-on box. Of course you would probably have to cut out a new piece of wallboard and patch it in, but the nail-on boxes are more secure than remodel boxes. Especially remodel boxes that are rather poorly mounted in patched-up holes.
 
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Old 03-18-04, 10:11 PM
S
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glue a shim to the back side of the drywall on the top or bottom to close the opening or set a 1/4 strip of wood on the back side of the drywall and use dry wall screws through the front of the sheetrock to secure it. The strip of wood will also act as a backer if you need to patch...
 
  #7  
Old 03-18-04, 10:12 PM
rdknott
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Thanks for the Advice

I will try your suggestions tomorrow.
 
 

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