Gfci


  #1  
Old 03-19-04, 11:20 AM
Bryan S.
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Gfci

I am converting a single GFCI outlet in my bathroom to a two receptacle outlet w/the other receptacle being a standard one. The GFCI is at the end of a run (one 3 wire cable in box). The 2 gang box is a blue plastic one. I know that I have to connect the black wire to Line-Hot (brass) and the white wire to Line-Neutral (silver) and bare copper to Ground (green screw) to the GFCI receptacle. My question is what connections do I need to make over to the standard receptacle. It has 2 brass screws both on the same side with a tab connecting them together. The same goes for the silver for the other side. And naturally it has a green screw for ground. This standard receptacle will be at the end of the run, I do not plan to add to it. Your help would be much appreciated. Thank You.
 
  #2  
Old 03-19-04, 11:44 AM
J
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Use a wire nut on the grounding wire to add two pigtails to it. Connect the grounding pigtails to the grounding screws on the two receptacles.

Use a short black jumper from load-hot to either one of the brass screws on the new receptacle, and a short white jumper from load-white to either one of the silver screws on the new receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 03-19-04, 11:46 AM
R
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The additional outlet gets connected to the load terminals on the GFCI.

Use a short piece of black 20 gauge wire (or 14 gauge if this is a 15 amp ciircuit) to connect the load hot terminal to either brass screw.

Use a short piece of white 20 gauge wire to connect the load neutral terminal to either of the silver screws.

The green ground screw on the new outlet needs to be connected to the bare ground wire. There are several ways to do this. If the bare ground wire is long enough you can wrap it around one ground screw and then around the other, or you can take a new piece of 20 gauge bare ground wire and use it to connect the grounds together.

When connecting wires, do not ever put more than one wire under a screw terminal. Use wire nuts and pigtails if necessary.
 
  #4  
Old 03-19-04, 04:45 PM
Bryan S.
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Thanks John and racraft for your information. It helped me complete my task which was successful. I knew it was something as simple as it was, but you never know especially when you're dealing w/electric. Once again thanks. Bryan S.
 
  #5  
Old 03-19-04, 07:01 PM
hotarc
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[QUOTE]Originally posted by racraft
...

Use a short piece of black 20 gauge wire (or 14 gauge if this is a 15 amp ciircuit) to connect the load hot terminal to either brass screw.

Use a short piece of white 20 gauge wire to connect the load neutral terminal to either of the silver screws.

...
[/QUOTE

Racraft, I believe you actually mean 12, rather than 20. 20 AWG is very small.

Bryan S., what size wire did you use for your pigtails? And what is the amperage rating of the fuse or breaker protecting this circuit?
 
  #6  
Old 03-19-04, 08:26 PM
Bryan S.
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Thanks for the reply hotarc. I didn't use any pig tails, I took the existing bare copper wire from the 3-wire 14/2 cable (which was long enough) to connect both receptacles as racraft mentioed in his reply. Currently this is on a 20 amp C/B, but I'm going to switch it to a 15 amp C/B which someone informed me to do. Thanks
 
  #7  
Old 03-20-04, 05:08 AM
R
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Yes, of course I meant 12 gauge. Lack of proofreading. My bad.
 
 

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