Undercabinet lighting wiring

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Old 03-21-04, 08:21 AM
69fbird
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Undercabinet lighting wiring

The house I'm building is getting the electric installed this week. In the kitchen I want to install undercabinet
lights. Should I have the electrician install outlets
(controlled by the same switch), behind one cabinet, on each side of the kitchen??
How do these lights usually get wired in new construction??
Whats the pro's and con's of hardwired vs plug-in??

What would be easier to work with later on?? I will probably use the low voltage xenon that uses a transformer.
Anybody have any tips for installation of this type??

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 03-21-04, 01:44 PM
Speedy Petey's Avatar
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My preference for new construction is line voltage. Xenon or flourescent.
Those puck lights are so cheap, and I don't mean inexpensive. I also don't trust the longevity of them.
Also there are dimming issues with low voltage. Yes you can dim them but I have had several problems.

Doesn't your electrician have any that he uses? What are his recommendations?
Is he just prewiring and you'll install later?
without the cabinet layout it's hard to advise.
If the customer insists on low voltage, I usually put a switched receptacle above the cabinets and splice on top, if ther is room and access.
 
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Old 03-21-04, 11:12 PM
69fbird
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Yes, I just want them to prewire, so I can install at a later date.
You said, you would install a switched receptacle above the cabinets,
If I was using low voltage.
Is that above the base cabinets or wall cabinets?
Are they inside the cabinets?
I have cabinets on the other side of the kitchen that is separated by a walkway, should I run two separate switches for each side or just run the wire to the other side If possible?

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 03-22-04, 04:41 AM
Speedy Petey's Avatar
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Above the uppers. There is usually a gap between the upper cabinets to slip the wires up through so you can splice above.
If you have full soffits above the uppers this method is obviously no good.
I would run a separate switch leg to the other side, off the same switch. This way they all come on together, if that's what you want. You will need another transformer to do it this way but they are not expensive. Also depending on the number of lights you intend to use you may need another transformer anyway.
 
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Old 03-22-04, 08:48 AM
69fbird
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Thanks for all the help.
Thats exactly want I needed to hear.

Thanks again
 
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