Installing a New Outlet

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  #1  
Old 03-24-04, 12:32 AM
The Mule
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Installing a New Outlet

Apologies for what must be a very commonly asked question...

But I need to install an additional electrical outlet in my bathroom. I have not done this before, and was wondering how difficult something like this is. There is already one outlet in the room, on the same wall that I want to install the new outlet. How would I go about doing this?

Thanks in advance.
The Mule
 
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Old 03-24-04, 05:35 AM
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"On the same wall" means very little. Unless you are trying to install this outlet in the same wall cavity (ie between the same two studs) as the existing outlet then you still have to get from one cavity to the next.

You have several options for installing a new outlet from the existing outlet. Do you want to enlarge the outlet box and have both receptacles in the same box, or do youw ant to install a completely new box?

Here are the basic directions. You must either remove and replace the existing box with a larger box, or install a new box. Then you must run wires from the existing outlet to the new outlet. For an outlet in the same box you just use small pieces of wire to do this. For an outlet in a new box you must run a cable, usually NM-B, from the old box to the new box.
 
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Old 03-24-04, 03:42 PM
The Mule
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Thanks, racraft. I would like to install a new box, and no, it would not be in the same cavity. Probably will have to get around one or maybe two studs.

Would this be the proper wire to use?

http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=prod...2-295-28828221

And if so, how exactly are the two outlets connected?
Thanks again for your response!
 
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Old 03-24-04, 06:41 PM
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Yes, this is the proper type of wire to use, assuming the circuit is a 20 amp circuit. If it is a 15 amp circuit then you can use 14 gauge wire.

The wire you will use has three conductors. A black conductor, a white conductor, and a bare ground conductor. The bare ground conductor is a ground and gets connected between the green ground screw on the new outlet and ground in the existing box. The black(hot) and white (neutral) get connected to the existing outlet and to the new outlet. How they get connected to the existing outlet depends on whether it is a GFCI outlet or not. If it nbot a GFCI outlet then I recommend that you put one in. our new outlet is wired to the load side of the FGCI, while the GFCI gets power on the line side.
 
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Old 03-25-04, 09:10 PM
The Mule
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Thanks again. Sounds straightforward enough... There turns out to be another outlet on the other side of the wall (next room) that is in the same cavity that I want to put this outlet, so I might just use that one. It is not GFCI though.
 
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Old 03-26-04, 06:00 AM
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You may not grab power from an outlet that serves another room. That would violate code.
 
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Old 03-26-04, 05:56 PM
The Mule
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That would violate code.
Well, that seems kind of silly, doesn't it? I don't understand the rationale for that at all.
 
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Old 03-26-04, 06:06 PM
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Under new code requirements, bathroom receptacle outlets must be on 20 amp circuits, and must be on circuits that are either dedicated exclusively to bathroom receptacle outlets, or are dedicated to outlets in one (and only one) bathroom. Further, receptacle outlets must be GFI protected.

This particular section of the code exists because of the increase in power requirements for and in sheer number of bathroom appliances. This includes hairdryers, curling irons, electric toothbrushes, electric razors, and on and on. The number of circuit overloads (breakers tripping or fuses blowing) increased dramatically. With every overload situation, the possibility that some moron is going to swap in a larger fuse or circuit breaker is present.

To protect against fires caused by overheating circuits, the code was changed to help guard against overloads.
 
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Old 03-26-04, 10:23 PM
The Mule
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OK, I see. So it applies to bathrooms. I didn't see why it would matter between other rooms, but I see the point about high powered bathroom appliances. Thanks for clarifying.
 
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