Ceiling fan control on a GFI circuit

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Old 04-04-04, 08:11 PM
bdybing
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Ceiling fan control on a GFI circuit

I've installed a ceiling fan in an upstairs bedroom but have run into an issue with the fan control that I purchased. For whatever reason, this bedroom is on the same circuit as the garage and the upstairs bathrooms (house was built in 1990). There is a GFI receptacle on the circuit (in the garage). The fan control indicates that it should not be used on a GFI circuit. At present the light and the fan in the bedroom are on their own single-pole switches. Any ideas on how to get the fan on a variable speed switch considering that there's a GFI receptacle in the circuit? Do the remote control RF fan controls have the same issue with a GFI receptacle in the circuit? Thanks for any help and/or ideas.
 
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Old 04-04-04, 10:24 PM
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Why not just run a new circuit? I know, it sounds like too much. But it only sounds like that because you've never done it before. Like going off the high dive, the first time is always the scariest. If you don't feel qualified, hire it out.
 
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Old 04-05-04, 12:47 AM
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i think that both the fan and the remote would not work on gfi circuits. does the gfi carry the load for both the garage and the upstairs? do a test on the gfi, and see if the upstairs is affected. if it is, than you can pactc into an existing line that's not gfi-protected, or just do away with the gfi and istall gfi's for single outlets you want protected.
Gfi's are meant to protect people, and do so by detecting changes in current. that's why the ceiling fan and remote won't work on gfi circuits.
running a new circuit is that simple in theory, but if you don't plan for it, it can be a pain.
 
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Old 04-05-04, 06:50 PM
bdybing
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Thanks for the quick responses.

First, I'm comfortable running a new circuit but this is an upstairs bedroom so fishing wires from upstairs to downstairs is really more than I want to tackle if there is a more efficient method to achieve the same result.

Second, a little additional information the status of the project so far. The GFI in the garage carries the load for both the garage and the upstairs. The circuit encompasses the garage lights and receptacles, the receptacles in both upstairs bathrooms and the light in the upstairs bedroom in question. I replaced the light in the bedroom with the ceiling fan/light and have managed to get it working. I wired a second switch off of the light switch to control the fan operation. At present I've just got the fan on a single pole switch. Speed changes are accomplished using the pull chain. This is a kid's bedroom, though, so the pull chain won't last long. Hence, the desire to replace the single pole switch with a variable speed fan control switch. I bought the switch but the directions indicate that it shouldn't be used on a GFI circuit. Your reply seems to indicate that maybe the fan shouldn't be on that circuit either.

Finally, if I understand your replies correctly, I can do away with the GFI in the garage and install a GFI in the bathroom that's upstream of the second bathroom. Assuming that the bathroom GFI is downstream of the bedroom in question, I can then use a variable speed fan switch in the bedroom without affecting the GFI. Is that right? The concern would be that the garage is no longer protected. However, I plan to install another circuit in the garage to get the receptacles off of the same circuit as the lights so I can rectify the lack of a GFI in the garage at that time.

Let me know if I'm on the right track. Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 04-06-04, 03:15 AM
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yes you understand correctly, the only caveat is that all bathrooms require gfi's after 1980. but that code is for madison, wi. your codes may vary, but hey it's your house, you can do anything you want to it. good luck with your new project, snuffs
 
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Old 04-06-04, 04:26 AM
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You cannot do away with the GFCI in the garage. garage receptacles should be GFCI protected. Whay you can do is change the wiring so that the garage GFCI does not protect the upstairs circuits.
 
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