GFCI pigtails


  #1  
Old 04-18-04, 08:43 AM
Howard Persun
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GFCI pigtails

I am looking at the back of my GFCI receptacle. It is of the type that you insert the wire as opposed to looping it around a screw. This receptacle will be in the middle of a run with other GFCI's. There are two holes in the line side that will fasten with the same screw. May I put the incoming wire in one hole and the outgoing wire in the other or do I still need to use only one of the holes by pigtailing two blacks or two whites together then only using one of the line holes.
 
  #2  
Old 04-18-04, 10:59 AM
W
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You can sometimes do this.

Do you know if the circuit feeding the other GFCIs is a multiwire branch circuit or not? In a multiwire branch circuit, you _must_ pigtail the neutral wires.

If it is not a multiwire branch circuit, then you _may_ use the backwire holes to continue the circuit. Many consider this a poor practise, however if these are proper backwire with a screw down pressure plate connections (as opposed to the 'backstab push the wire in and let a spring hold it' connection), then I am comfortable using the backwire holes to continue the circuit.

-Jon
 
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Old 04-18-04, 12:19 PM
J
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middle of a run with other GFCI's
That's illogical (unless this is a multiwire circuit, or unless there is something on the circuit that you do not want GFCI protected). Why are you doing that? Are you not going to use the load side? If not, why not (unless this is a multiwire circuit, or ...)?

As Jon said, if this is a multiwire circuit, then you must at least pigtail the neutral, but you can use the two connectors for the hots if you want.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 04-18-04 at 12:31 PM.
  #4  
Old 04-18-04, 07:25 PM
Howard Persun
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These are screw down pressure plate connections and in fact the same screw that I would hook a pigtail to also holds the pressure plate tight. I will not be using the load side since each receptacle on the circuit will be a GFCI.
 
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Old 04-18-04, 07:34 PM
W
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I believe that John is curious as to _why_ each receptacle in the circuit is an independent GFCI. If you connect 'normal' receptacles to the load side of the GFCI, then these receptacles, as well as the wiring in between, get full GFCI protection.

GFCI receptacles are considerably more expensive than ordinary duplex receptacles, and this is the main reason that GFCI receptacles are used to feed ordinary receptacles.

The downside of this is that if you have a ground fault somewhere, you have to go chasing around to find the GFCI receptacle that has tripped.

Personally, I see no problem with making each receptacle its own GFCI, but it will cost more and you will have to spend more time on your monthly test of proper operation.

-JOn
 
 

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