grounding an old house


  #1  
Old 04-18-04, 04:08 PM
magnusnova
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
grounding an old house

I am installing a 220v dryer in my house and it needs to be grounded.

Question 1 is how exactly do you add a ground in the box.

Q 2 is the neutral (white) the grounded to the box

Q3 When I wired my A/C I attached the ground to the small metal box where the switch is with a screw, is that considered grounded sence the rest of wiring is old

Q4 on the neutral bar I have a bare sold cable (I think it copper)covered in a metal sheathing is this a ground
 
  #2  
Old 04-18-04, 06:05 PM
phillyguy
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Q1 : If by "box" you mean circuit breaker panel then I believe you can run the green wire from your dryer to the panel and attach it to the neutral bus.

Q2: Not really sure what you're asking here, but the neutral and the ground wires will attach to the same place in the panel. Provided its not a sub panel but the main panel.

Q3: It would be considered grounded if the box itself is grounded. You'll have to verify the box itself is grounded.

Q4: Not sure.
 
  #3  
Old 04-18-04, 06:26 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
We need the bigger picture. Did you just buy a new dryer? Or move into an old house? Or what?

Dryers have different grounding rules than air conditioners, and the dryer rules are different for circuits installed prior to 1996 than those installed after 1996. Perhaps you have a new dryer with a four-prong plug that you are trying to attach to a dryer circuit installed prior to 1996 that only has three holes in the receptacle? If so, let us know and we can tell you what the correct approach is.
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-04, 07:30 PM
magnusnova
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Ok I just bought a new dryer and brought It home today. I think this house is around 50 yrs old if not more. It never had a dryer before. I had my neighbors father wire in a 3 prong receptacle in recently but my dryer plug is 4 so I plan on replacing the receptacle my self. My quetion is where exactly does the ground go and what do I do If the panel not grounded. How can I tell If the box its self is grounded? By "Box" I mean the main fuse panel. I might be able to get a pic of the box later If its any help.
 
  #5  
Old 04-18-04, 07:55 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I had my neighbors father wire in a 3 prong receptacle in recently.
How recently? In what year? Did he just wire the receptacle, or did he wire the whole circuit?

Whether or not the panel is grounded is irrelevant to this discussion. But if it isn't, you should fix that for other reasons.

You need to look inside the dryer receptacle box (shut off the breaker first) to see if there is a grounding wire there that isn't connected to anything. Have you already done that?

I reserve the right to change this answer depending your answers to the questions above, but the most likely answer is that you should change the cord-and-plug on your dryer to match the receptacle. We can cover how to do that properly when we decide that this is really the right answer.

Note that we don't get to make anything up here. The rules are very, very clear and all we do is follow them.
 
  #6  
Old 04-18-04, 09:28 PM
magnusnova
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I had him install it about two weeks ago and I was watching what he was doing. He ran 3 wires (red, white, and green)from the fuse box to the receptacle. red and white to 110 each and green to the this
The easy answer for me is to change the plug and wire, but would that be safe? Would I have a shock hazard?
 
  #7  
Old 04-18-04, 09:46 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
The installation is illegal. I don't know how much money you saved by hiring your neighbor's father, but it wasn't worth it.

If all this wire is in conduit, then add a new #10 copper black wire to the existing #10 copper wires (I hope that's what they are). In the panel, move the white wire off the 30-amp double-pole breaker (I hope that's what he put in) and on to the neutral bus. Add the black wire to the breaker instead. Replace the receptacle with a proper four-hole one. Connect red and black to X and Y, white to W and green to ground.

P.S. I couldn't get your link to work.
 
  #8  
Old 04-18-04, 10:05 PM
magnusnova
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thank you very much I guess this would have been alot easier if I know what i was talking about. Your help is much appreciated.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: