?conduit/ground rod proximity?

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  #1  
Old 04-19-04, 08:31 AM
purplenuts
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?conduit/ground rod proximity?

Great forum, I've learned quite a bit just from scanning the posts, but I didn't find the answer to my question:

running UF 14 in conduit out to my garage...the convenient exit from the house is through an above ground-ground level wooden window frame--the same exit used by the main ground from the circuit box.

?Is it okay for my conduit trench (18") to run directly by the ground rod, or do i need to insulate between the rod and the new line?[COLOR=darkred]
 
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Old 04-19-04, 08:36 AM
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It can run by the ground rod. Since the conduit is buried, it's pretty well grounded anyway. Are you using metal or PVC conduit?
 
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Old 04-19-04, 08:40 AM
purplenuts
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pvc...can I run two wires through one conduit? Maybe I shoud use a 20 amp breaker and run a bigger wire (12)?

It's only going to run a pair of gang boxes, some lights and a garage door opener...

thanks for the help,
john
 
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Old 04-19-04, 08:48 AM
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If you are going to the trouble of running wires to the garage in a trench you are digging, I would at least use 12 gauge wire. Better yet, I would run 12/3 and do a multiwire circuit.

You never know when you may want something else in the garage that either needs it's own circuit or that will almost max out a circuit.
 
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Old 04-19-04, 08:54 AM
purplenuts
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Thanks loads (heh), guys!
 
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Old 04-19-04, 08:59 AM
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If the conduit is large enough, you can put multiple cables through it. However, code prohibits running multiple circuits to an outbuilding so this may nix that plan. Bob's idea of a multiwire circuit is good (if you know what a multiwire circuit is and all the caveats that go with it). And yes, certainly use at least 12-gauge wire.

So far we haven't discussed how far it is to your garage, but that factor can be an enormous consideration!
 
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Old 04-19-04, 09:09 AM
purplenuts
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The garage is a brick structure, located 25' from the circuit box in the basement.

I don't know about multiwire circuits, but I will use 12 ga. wire instead of the 14...

john
 
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Old 04-19-04, 09:40 AM
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25 feet is not long enough to be an issue.

A multiwire circuit would be a single run of 12/3 with ground. The two hots are connected to opposite legs of the incoming voltage, and the neutral and ground are connected as normal.

This means that you have two circuits in the garage, rather than one, effectively doubling the amount of current you can draw at once.

As John said, multiwire circuits have special code requirements, and those requirements must be followed or you can create a serious life threatening situation.

If you go with a multiwire circuit, then I recommend running the 12/3 to a single junction box where you then create two separate circuits. You could put your GFCI protection at this box. This makes your wiring the additional outlets (lights or receptacles) much easier and much less confusing.
 
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