rewire Garage


  #1  
Old 04-24-04, 02:48 PM
wire
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rewire Garage

Hi,

I need to redo the electrical my garage. Currently there is only a recepticle attached to a beam. I need to do the following:

1. Install a recepticle for my garage door opener near the opener. Ie. constant power to recepticle
2. Install a single pole switch to control 2 8ft florescent fixtures that are mounted in the ceiling. Box is already located near side garage door.
3. Install a couple of recepticles near the back of the garage. ie. constant power as well.

There is switch box near the side door. In the box there is wire that feeds the duplex (old 2 wire , no ground wire) and the main power line. So far, I've run 14/2 from 1 florescent fixture to the other. What do I have to do next. Do I need to run 14/3 from the florescent to the switch box?

Thanks for your help. I hope I've been clear enough.
M
 
  #2  
Old 04-24-04, 04:07 PM
J
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If you put all this new stuff on some random existing circuit you found in your garage, sooner or later you are going to disappointed when you find that the breaker keeps tripping. It would be best to install a new circuit or two for this new stuff. I realize that maybe you have not previously installed new circuits so perhaps you find that prospect intimidating. However, this is similar to the first time you go off the high dive--it's not so bad once you do it the first time.

If you want to explore the possibility that this garage circuit has excess capacity, then you need to do extensive investigation to see what else is on this circuit. Often garage circuits also power other stuff in remote and scattered parts of the house. It is common for bathrooms, porches and basements to be on the garage circuits, but other things are possible too.

Now that I've gotten that out of the way...

You mention two cables in the switch box. One that supplies power and one that feeds the receptacle. That leaves the question of what the switch controls, and where is the cable that goes to that. Does the switch control the receptacle? Are you talking about a preexisting switch box, or a new switch box that you installed as part of this project?

It is unlikely that you need 14/3 to the switch box, but we won't know for sure until we resolve the apparent inconsistencies.
 
  #3  
Old 04-24-04, 04:40 PM
wire
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The garage is on a 15AMP circuit. As far as I can tell it only services the garage. I'll take a closer look to see what else is fed off of this. Running a new circuit would be difficult since this is a detached garage. How do people usually run more power to their garage. I plan on using some powertools in the garage and more power would be better.

Back to the problem...
There is only 1 switch box in the garage. I actually removed the switch because it was controlling the 1 single recepticle on the single rafter. I simply marred the white/white, black/black.
 
  #4  
Old 04-24-04, 04:40 PM
R
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Do not extend the existing circuit. It is not properly grounded. It would be a code violation to do extend this circuit. Plus, the flourescent lights might not like the lack of ground. Plus the possibility, as John mentioned, that the breaker might constantly be tripping.
 
  #5  
Old 04-24-04, 04:44 PM
wire
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Hmm.

Sounds like a should get an electrician to take a look at this situation.
In the switch box, there are 2 wires. I think the power source is the typical "White 14/2". The old black/white 2 cable wire feeds the recepticle.

I think I may have to remove the old black/white 2 wire cable and replace this with current 14/2 that comes with a ground.

I'm still going to call an electrician on this one.
 
  #6  
Old 04-24-04, 04:54 PM
R
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If you are going to be replacing the wire, which is a good idea, you should not replace it with 14/2. You should at least use 12/2. However, with the possibility of power tools and such in the future, I would recommend either a 12/3 multiwire circuit, or even a sub panel, depending on what you plan on running, and if you would want to run phone out there as well.
 
  #7  
Old 04-24-04, 05:17 PM
wire
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Hi,

A sub panel would be a nice idea. What kind of wire would I have to run to it?
 
  #8  
Old 04-24-04, 05:34 PM
R
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The wire size for a sub panel depends on several factors.

The distance the wire needs to run, the size (in amps) of the subpanel and the the type of wire used (aluminum or copper). The size of the subpanel depends entirely on what you intens to run with the power.
 
 

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