ground wire 3wg to 2wg

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  #1  
Old 05-09-04, 02:15 PM
Bouge
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ground wire 3wg to 2wg

I added a distribution box to add a heat pump to a sun room and wire my basement. The service wire from the service panel to the new box is 3 wire with ground. I wired the new panel with 2 hot, 1 common and added a grounding kit for the ground wire. I have a #6 3 wire w ground leaving the new panel to a 230 v receptical for my heat pump. Question: do i wire the white common to the receptical grounding post or the gorund wire? what do i do with the additonal wire?
 
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  #2  
Old 05-10-04, 07:40 AM
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You ran the wrong cable. You don't need the white wire, so just cap it off at both ends. Don't attach it to anything.
 
  #3  
Old 05-10-04, 11:20 AM
Bouge
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ok thanks for the reply when i un-hook the white wire from the common strip and cap off, do i move the ground(bare copper) from the ground strip kit to the common strip or leave it where it is?
 
  #4  
Old 05-10-04, 12:44 PM
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The bare wire is a grounding wire. Connect it where the other grounding wires are connected.
 
  #5  
Old 05-10-04, 08:31 PM
Bouge
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John, thanks for your help but I still do not understand. Let me start over: I added an additional panel in my basement to allow me to install an ac/heatpump for my sun room and add circuits to finish my basement. I did this by adding a 100 amp breaker to my main panel, wiring 3 wire w ground # 2 alluminum. at the main panel i connected the red and blk to the 100 amp breaker, the white and the copper to the grounding bar, is this correct? Into the new sub panel I connected the red and blk to the two hot lugs, the white to the neutal lug and the copper to the grounding bar. At the sub panel i have a 30 amp breaker with #6 3 wire w ground wired red and blk to breaker, white to neutral bar and ground connected to a ground bar added with kit, is this correct? I ran the #6 3 wire with ground to a 230v receptical for the AC. I understand that the red and blk connect to the hot terminals in the receptical but which connects to the neutral, the white or the copper and what do i do with the remaining wire? The 110 circuits from the sub panel are wired blk to breaker , white to neutral bar and ground to ground bar added with kit, correct? your help will be greatly appreciated.
 
  #6  
Old 05-10-04, 09:25 PM
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Your heat pump does not need a neutral. Cap off the white neutral on both ends. Use the ground and the two hots.
 
  #7  
Old 05-11-04, 07:45 AM
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I understand that the red and blk connect to the hot terminals in the receptical but which connects to the neutral, the white or the copper and what do i do with the remaining wire?
As Bob said, there is no neutral. So the white wire (which serves as the neutral in circuits that actually have a neutral) will be unused. Connect the bare wire to the third terminal on your receptacle, and connect the bare wire at the panel end to where the other bare wires are connected (i.e., the added grounding bar). You can leave the white wire connected at the panel if you want to (since it's disconnected at the receptacle end), but it will waste space on your neutral bar, and will confuse somebody some day, so I'd recommend removing it and capping it off.

As I said originally, you ran the wrong cable. You didn't need 6/3. 6/2 would have done nicely. If you would have run 6/2, you would have used the white wire (remarked) in place of the red wire in the 6/3.

The 110 circuits from the sub panel are wired blk to breaker , white to neutral bar and ground to ground bar added with kit, correct?
Yes, this is correct. Be sure to throw the green bonding screw that came with your subpanel in the trash.
 
  #8  
Old 05-11-04, 12:33 PM
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As I said originally, you ran the wrong cable. You didn't need 6/3. 6/2 would have done nicely.
10/2 would have been nicer. I would like to see how he got that #6AWG onto that 30A receptacle.
 
  #9  
Old 05-11-04, 12:42 PM
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10/2 would have been nicer
Indeed. This project raises many questions.
 
  #10  
Old 05-11-04, 01:38 PM
Bouge
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Yes it does raise many questions),,,I received some bad direction but seem to have come to the right place,,,thanks. Here is my plan please verify. The wiring from the main panel to the sub panel stays the same, e.g. main panel red/blk to hot and white and copper to ground bar, at the sub panel end red and blk into hot lugs, white to common and copper to ground bar. i am changing out the #6 from sub to AC with #10 2wg, blk and white from hot breaker and ground from grounding bar kit to receptical with blk and white to hot _ _and copper to ground -, sound like a plan?
 
  #11  
Old 05-11-04, 01:54 PM
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It is a plan and a good one. Don't forget to tape the white wire black.
 
  #12  
Old 05-11-04, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson
As I said originally, you ran the wrong cable. You didn't need 6/3. 6/2 would have done nicely.
Originally Posted by mcjunk
10/2 would have been nicer. I would like to see how he got that #6AWG onto that 30A receptacle.
This is "one" of the problems my friend had, which I listed in another post. He had used 6/3 for a 15 amp 220 volt circuit when he needed only 14/2. He couldn't figure out where to put that white wire either

This leads me back to my first question, which was answered, but I didn't quite understand it:

Let's assume that the distance of the run is less than 10'. If the original poster to this thread, Bouge, wanted to go ahead and use his 6/3 in this 30 amp circuit (disconnecting/capping off the white wire - since it's not needed) because he spent the extra $$ for it, would there be a downside to it, other than the fact that the size of the wire would be difficult to manage with a 30 amp receptacle?

I realize that using a 12AWG wire for a 15 amp circuit, for example, isn't so bad, but what about using a 10AWG cable for that same 15 amp circuit?

Thanks
 
  #13  
Old 05-11-04, 02:35 PM
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You can run the larger wire, but the devices that you use for termination (breakers, receptacles, etc.) are not rated to handle the larger conductors. You will have to splice a piece of the correct guage before making terminations.
 
  #14  
Old 05-20-04, 03:23 PM
Bouge
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Inspector came today

Folk,
The county electrical inspector came today and this one passed....thanks for all your help.
 
  #15  
Old 05-21-04, 03:21 AM
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There is nothing wrong with running a larger wire than the circuit requires, but as mcjunk noted, along with the larger wire, everything else dealing with that wire needs to be increased in size appropriately.

This means that you need to have terminations which can connect to the larger wire (or you need to pigtail short length of smaller wire). You also need larger junction and outlet boxes to fit the larger wire. Finally, you must also increase the size of the ground wire in proportion to the phase wires; ordinary 6-2+g romex is _not_ to code for a 15A circuit since the bare ground wire in 6-2 romex is usually only 10ga.

-Jon
 
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