3 wire to 4 wire range questions


  #1  
Old 05-17-04, 08:27 AM
hammerMan
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3 wire to 4 wire range questions

I’m nearing completion on my first Big remodel project. Today I’m setting in the new range and changing over from 3 wire to 4 wire. Here are a few questions and concerns.


Equipment to install: Hotpoint electric Range (elec glass cooktop /elec oven combo) standard Home depot $399. Special in Black.

Questions:

1. Will the breaker handle the new range? The breaker is a double pull 30 amp… or is it? It looks like two separate 30 amp breakers with a “tie together” on the switch part. So do I have 30 amps or 60 amps?
2. Will the existing wiring handle the new range and 4-conductor plug? The house was built in 1976 the wire is 4 conductor (hoo-ray) red, black, white and bare. It is the wire for the old cook top that I removed. The guy at home depot said I needed nothing less then 6 gauge wire… wow that is pretty heavy wire…. It looks like what is in the house is closer to 10 gauge… is that o.k.?
3. Does updating to 4 wire require a wiring change at the breaker panel? The neutral (white) is generally terminated with the ground…right? If the range has a dedicated ground, separate from the neutral, will it defeat the purpose to sum the wires at the breaker panel?
4. Last but not least the 4-wire surface mount plug that I bought at Lowes came with no instructions. There are 4 screws inside, green (ground I assume) silver (neutral, white I assume) and two gold… does it matter witch side the black and red go to?

Thanks,
hammerMan
 
  #2  
Old 05-17-04, 08:46 AM
J
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A 30 amp breaker is good for #10 wire prtection.
#10 wire not normally used for a range. They are normally on #6 or #8 and a 40 amp or 50 amp breaker.
Without knowing the rating of the new range can't say if the existing wires are large enough. Probably not if they are #10.
Red and black to the gold screws. It does not matter which one.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-04, 08:51 AM
J
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1. It's 30-amp. To find out whether or not it's correct, you'll have to pull out the installation instructions for your new unit. 30-amps isn't enough for most ranges, but it might be for yours.

2. Ditto. Look at the installation instructions.

3. Sounds like you already have four wire. If the wire and breaker are the right size (see above), then no changes will be required at the panel.

4. It does not matter which hot goes to which terminal.
 
  #4  
Old 05-17-04, 08:58 AM
hammerMan
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Thanks for the replies. Is there a way I can determine what gauge wire I actually have? There is not enough Length sticking out of the wall to read the jacket.
Thanks
hM
 
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Old 05-17-04, 09:04 AM
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Look for a label on the new range that list it's electrical characteristics. It should say how many Watts or V/A that it consumes. Dividing the watts by 240 will give you the minimum amperage that the range can be supplied. I cannot remember one range that was supplied by a thirty ampere circuit. Many are supplied by a forty ampere circuit but fifty amperes is used in new construction. If the range is lightly used the thirty ampere circuit may well do fine but when you get in to the home stretch of thanksgiving dinner preparation the thirty ampere breaker may well open.
--
Tom Horne
 
  #6  
Old 05-18-04, 06:59 AM
mrmoray
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Smile similar question

I'm getting ready to install a single wall oven. According to the label, it reads:

3.6 kW @ 240V

So do I divide 240 by 3.6 and get 65 amp circuit? Or is it the other way around, but first converting kW to Watts and dividing, so 3600 by 240 and getting 15.

Its a Kenmore oven and the website says the Max Amp Load = 20, but I thought that sounded kinda low for an oven, so I'm double checking.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 05-18-04, 08:38 AM
R
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P = VI. That is to say, Power = Volts x Amps.

3.6 KW = 3600 watts. On a 240 circuit that yields 3600/220 = 15 amps.

This would indeed imply a 20 amp circuit.
 
  #8  
Old 05-18-04, 09:23 AM
mrmoray
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thanks

thanks Racraft. I guess the website is accurate, just seemed low.

Thanks again!
 
  #9  
Old 05-18-04, 09:33 AM
mrmoray
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follow up...

I guess as a follow-up....what gauge wire should be in place for this circuit? Its about a 60'-70' run from the breaker box to the oven in the kitchen.

Thanks Again!
 
  #10  
Old 05-22-04, 05:39 AM
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#12 AWG minimum with a 20a 2 pole breaker
 
  #11  
Old 05-31-04, 06:56 AM
lromero314
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yet another similar question

I'm installing a new cooktop (GE939BHBB). The outlet for my
old range has 4 wires (one gray, two blacks and one bare). The cable for my cooktop, however, only has 3 wires (one black, one red and one bare).
I believe the gray in the outlet is the neutral which means the difference between the 2 black wires should be 240V. Does that mean I connect the 2 black wires in the outlet to the black and red of the cooktop (one to one) and
what do I do with the gray wire?

thanks,
Luis
 
  #12  
Old 05-31-04, 03:50 PM
J
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The range certainly comes with two sets of installation instructions, one for a four-wire connection and one for a three-wire connection. Follow the four-wire connection instructions exactly. This will involve removing a bonding strap and perhaps buying a different cord and plug.
 
 

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