120/240 dual to 240 only

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  #1  
Old 06-03-04, 06:22 AM
4runnin'
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120/240 dual to 240 only

I have an arc welder that I am borrowing for a project. I don't have the right 240 outlet (since there is like 10 of them). I do have a stove range outlet that I can use. I am making an adapter so I can plug in the arc welder into the stove range outlet. The adapter is the male plug of the stove range which is connected to a wire which is connected to the female plug of the arc welder. The only problem is that the stove range outlet has 4 wires (red,black,white,bare) and the arc welder (which is about 20 years old) has only three wires. I know the white is the neutral and it is used for double phase devices, but if I make this adapter, should I just use the two hots (red,black) and ground (bare) and just cap the white (not connect it to anything)?

Please note that this would be a very temporary installation (1.5 weeks) and the welder would only be plugged in when I am working on it. I would run a dedicated 240 only line, but it's just so temporary.

Thanks for the help!

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  #2  
Old 06-03-04, 06:47 AM
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Yes, cap the white. It is not needed for the welder.
 
  #3  
Old 06-03-04, 07:25 AM
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While Joe gave you the correct answer, I feel the need to correct your understanding of a four wire circuit.

residential power is single phase. The four wires to your stove are two hot wires, one neutral and one ground. The neutral is used for 240 devices that have a 120 component. The unbalanced current on either of the hot lines is returned on the neutral. The two hot wires are each 120 volts. The difference between them is 240 volts.
 
  #4  
Old 06-03-04, 07:48 AM
4runnin'
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Yes, I thought that was what I said, maybe I said it unclearly. Like in a dryer, a 120 is required by the motor for the drum. If you measured voltage from a hot to neutral, you get 120, cross both hots, 240. I think you misunderstood me =)

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  #5  
Old 06-03-04, 08:13 AM
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Your use of the term "double phase device" threw me. As long as we're on the same page...
 
  #6  
Old 06-03-04, 07:00 PM
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I have to ask the question of the capacity of the range circuit you intend to attach on to, as well as the current requirements of the welder. The reason there are 10 different types of outlets for one reason is different current requirements.
 
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