Kitchen Remodel


  #1  
Old 06-03-04, 11:33 AM
R
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Kitchen Remodel

I am about to remodel my kitchen, which will include removing an island and replacing a built-in desk and small pantry closet with more counter space. I would like to make sure that whatever I do is code compliant. I will acquire a permit. I think I know some of the requirements, but I'll run them by here for verification, and I'd like to know if anything else is relevant/unique to kitchen wiring. BTW, I am only dealing with receptacles that must be removed, moved, or added.

For example:
Any space 12" or more requires a receptacle.
No more that two receptacles on a branch.
All circuits must be 20A.
All GFCI protected?
What is maximum distance between receptacles on long cabinet runs?

Please add or correct as necessary.

Thanks,
 
  #2  
Old 06-03-04, 11:50 AM
J
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The kitchen is probably the most electrically regulated room in the house, and rightly so. I suggest the book "Wiring Simplified", a $6 green paperback available in the electrical aisle of Home Depot. You need to get this exactly right.

Here's the rules in a nutshell, but don't settle for this information alone. Get the book.
  • All receptacles serving the countertop must be GFCI protected.
  • All receptacles serving the countertop must be on a 20-amp circuit, and there must be at least two such circuits.
  • These circuits, called small-appliance circuits, may only serve countertop receptacles in the kitchen, and receptacles in a dining room or pantry. Optionally, they may also serve the refrigerator (although I suggest the refrigerator be on its own 15-amp circuit).
  • No spot on the counter may be more than 24 inches from a receptacle. This generally means that you need a receptacle within 24" of the end of a counter, and no more than every 48" thereafter. The sink and stove end one counter and start another. Counters less than 12" in length do not need a receptacle.
  • The standard appliance rules apply to the disposal and dishwasher. I generally recommend putting each on its own 20-amp circuit, although you can usually put them both on the same 20-amp circuit (but I wouldn't).
  • Cooking appliance wiring should be done according to the appliance manufacturer's installation instructions.
  • No lighting may be on a small appliance circuit, so it's best to have a different circuit for kitchen lighting (although lighting in other rooms may also be on this circuit).
  • Kitchen islands have very special considerations.
There is no "No more that two receptacles on a branch" rule.
 
  #3  
Old 06-03-04, 11:54 AM
R
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John,

This isn't the first time you've helped me out. I can't tell you how valuable having this resource available can be. I think you answered all my questions/concerns. I am going to get a copy of the book as well.

Thanks again,
 
 

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