Grounding a Breaker Box


  #1  
Old 06-05-04, 07:55 PM
pilotswife
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Grounding a Breaker Box

Hello,

The current house I live has a properly grounded line between the breaker box and the water line, but I needed to intstall a missing grounding rod. I bought the 5/8" x 8' grounding rod and hammered all but 10" in the ground. My question is: What gauge wire do I need to run from the breaker box to this grounding rod? It is for standard residential house current. Also, did I install the grounding rod to code? I have heard differing information about whether it needed buried or not. Thanks in advance for any info someone can provide.
 
  #2  
Old 06-05-04, 09:05 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
First of all, hammer it in the last 10 inches. The full 8 feet must be in contact with the earth. Then use #4 copper if unprotected, or #6 copper inside conduit. The answer might vary a bit depending on the size of your service. You didn't say whether you have 60-amp, 100-amp, 125-amp, 150-amp, or 200-amp service (or something else).
 
  #3  
Old 06-06-04, 08:32 AM
pilotswife
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Sorry John, I have a 100A service. Is the #4/#6 suggestion still valid? Also, I assume that that the idea is to have both, the rod, and the clamped ground wire buried once the last 10" is hammered in the ground. Also, I live in Elyria, Ohio, USA in case that changes your answer.

Thanks Again.
 
  #4  
Old 06-06-04, 11:42 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 17,733
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
I misled you a bit. The required size of the grounding electrode conductor is not dependent on the service size, but on the size of the service entrance conductors. At any rate, #6 copper will be good enough if free from exposure to physical damage and run along the surface of the building. You might be able to get by with #8, but you'd have to put it in conduit, so that's not very practical. If you want to read all the gory details, exceptions, additional rules, etc., then visit your local public library and read article 250.52 through 250.70 in the NEC in the reference section of the library.
 
  #5  
Old 06-06-04, 11:43 AM
P
Member
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: port chester n y
Posts: 1,983
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If the Bonding-Jumper (B-J)that connects to the G-R is the ONLY conductor that connects to the G-R, then #6 copper is permissible, but I would use #4 for the B-J as JN has advised.

If the Bonding Jumper must be inserted in a raceway for neatness, protection, etc., then use PVC Conduit - a metal raceway must Bonded to the B-J at all points where the B-J enters/leaves the raceway.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
  #6  
Old 06-06-04, 12:54 PM
pilotswife
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
Thanks both of you for the advice. I just went out to Home Depot and got the #4 bare copper wire (I'm sure it will be a joy to work with since it is so thick (sarcasm)). I will just run it unprotected from the box, then outside against the house, and over to the pole just off the edge of the house. After attached, I will pound the grounding rod the rest of the way into the ground. If missed anything based on the replies you sent, let me know. It sounded like I don't need the conduit unless I wanted it for cosmetic purposes and if I use it, then get PVC. If it is required, let me know. Thanks again for the advise.
 
  #7  
Old 06-08-04, 10:51 PM
H
Member
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NE INDIANA
Posts: 109
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Allow me to add something that may be taken for granted... be sure the clamp that you attach the wire to rod with is the proper type, not the type used to ground to a water line. A hardware store stocks both types, and if the person you ask isn't well versed in the difference, you'll have to change it upon inspection.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: