Home Office Wiring


  #1  
Old 06-10-04, 04:10 AM
pennerr
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Home Office Wiring

I am currently building a home office in my basement, and planning to frame using metal studs. One of the problems I have in my area is intermittent 1-2 second power outages so I am thinking of installing a small 1kva UPS in an alcove under the stairs behind one of the office walls. I have 2 concerns that I could use some advice on.

1) I want to have my office equipment (pc, router, modem, phone) on the UPS, but they will not all be installed in the same location in the room. Can I run a line from the panel to an outlet near the UPS, plug the UPS into this outlet and then feed the run to isolated ground outlets from a power cord coming out of a wall outlet?

2) With metal studs, what is the best way to install isolated ground outlets.

Thanks...Ron
 
  #2  
Old 06-10-04, 04:36 AM
R
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1) As I understand your question, the answer is no. A UPS with normal receptacle outlets is not allowed to be used to supply power back into the wall, which is what you would need to do.

2) I'm not sure that I understand your question. An isolated ground is an isolated ground. In my opinion they aren't worth the money they cost, but even if you want them the studs make no difference.

If all you want to handle are small 1 to 2 second power outages, then I recommend a small UPS at each location you want to protect. The type of units I am thinking of are available for well under $100 and provide power for several minutes during a power outage. Since they are designed for computers, they also usually come with software and cables so that they can tell the computer to automatically powerdown when they detect that the battery ipower is approaching the point where it can no longer power the equipment.

If you really want a larger UPS, then consider a hardwired unit that you would install near the panel and use it to power the circuits that feed the office.
 
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Old 06-10-04, 06:31 AM
G
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racraft has a very valid point on buying a smaller model of UPS and connecting the system right at your desk.
I would suggest you forget about the Isolated Ground for what you are doing. In most instances they don't provide the protection most people are led to believe they do.
 
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Old 06-10-04, 05:46 PM
J
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You are confusing isolated ground with power protection. In a home situation all grounds are already isolated.
 
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Old 06-10-04, 06:44 PM
R
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Whoa Joed,

Grounds in a home are NOT isolated. All the grounds on a circuit are connected together, and any other circuits that share junction boxes are also tied in.

An isolated ground receptacle is a special type of receptacle where the ground terminal of the receptacle is isolated from the other metal on the outlet. These receptacles are designed to be installed with a separate ground wire that runs all the way back to the panel. This isolates the ground on the receptacle from the other grounds on the system.
 
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Old 06-10-04, 08:52 PM
J
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Depending on the circumstance, you're both right. The grounding in a residential circuit may or may not be isolated, depending on how the circuit was run. It's all moot anyway, because as has been pointed out by others, isolated ground circuits in a home offer little to no advanages. This idea keeps cropping up because some books suggest it.
 
  #7  
Old 06-11-04, 05:37 PM
J
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You run the ground all the way back to the panel and connect it to all the ground bar. What's the difference if you just use the ground wire in the cable that runs all the way back to the panel and connects to the ground bar? Isolated grounds are not a separate wire for each receptacle back to the panel. An isolated ground can supply more than one receptacle. They only apply in commercial applications where transformers are involved to distribute power around the building.
 
 

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