Kitchen electrical


  #1  
Old 06-21-04, 06:14 AM
kcharney
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Kitchen electrical

I have noticed some electical issues in a recently purchased 12 year old home. I live in Virginia. In the kitchen I have 2 circut breakers dedicated to 8 outlets. I have noticed a strange clicking noise in a radio in the kitchen that is not on but plugged in, additionally I have coffee pot that contains an internal trip--it trips with no other load on the circut every time I brew a pot. The wiring tests correct and works but I fear that I could be doing some damage. I am pretty hand and understand wiring but this has me stumped. Any suggestions??
 
  #2  
Old 06-21-04, 07:43 AM
J
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Your symptoms are unfamiliar to me. You might want to take a voltmeter and see if the voltage is too high and/or too low. Or you might be having voltage spikes caused internally or externally. As an experiment, you could put these two things on a surge suppressor. You might be able to convince your power company to temporarily put a voltage monitor on your line. Does this coincide with stormy weather? You might consider a whole house surge suppressor (about $300 installed).
 
  #3  
Old 06-21-04, 10:02 AM
P
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First, eliminate the coffee-percolator problem. The problem could be internal or external. Apparantly the precolator is equipped with a saftey device that will open the circuit. it may be doing what it's designed to do- prevent un-safe operation.

Operate the percolator with an analog ( deflecting needle) voltmeter connected to the receptacle that the percolator is plugged into."Normal" voltage is 110-120 volts.

Please know that a "open" Neutral in a 3-wire Branch-Circuit may cause a severe voltage un-balance- 150 volts across one of the 2 circuits, and 70 volts across the other, depending on the resistance of the connected loads.

All counter-top kitchen receptacles should be GFI protected.

Good Luck & Enjoy the Experience!!!!!!!!!!
 
 

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