Can I splice 6 gage wiring ?

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  #1  
Old 06-28-04, 10:57 PM
worldly
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Can I splice 6 gage wiring ?

Gang,

I am building a new deck but moving the hot tub has caused a stop. I need to extend the wiring by 25-30 feet. At first I thought I might just splice together the wires but now I am not sure this is such a good idea since the splices will need to be pushed/pulled through 1" PVC.

Thoughts/Comments ?

Thanks - worldly
 
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  #2  
Old 06-29-04, 01:41 AM
doingitmyself
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<b>disclaimer</b>: I'm not a pro, just offering my thoughts: Please wait for more informed opinions.

1. I don't think (actually, I'm positive) that you cannot run a splice through conduit, since the splice would not be accessible for repair/inspection, etc., and of course, pulling and tugging on a splice that is space-restrictive (inside conduit) would subject those splices to tearing apart. As a general rule, you may make splices in junction boxes. However, those j-boxes must be accessible.

Is there any reason you could not make the splice inside a j-box, anchored to the deck, for instance, and then run the additional, unspliced, wire through the conduit, which would connect to the j-box?

2. #6 wire is big.

I'm not sure that splicing is recommended with that large of a conductor. I've not read that anywhere, nor do I have any first hand experience with that issue, but it would seem 'not good'. I assume that an entirely new cable run would be cost-prohibitive?

I hope I have helped, somewhat, but you must wait for more informed advice.
 
  #3  
Old 06-29-04, 04:45 AM
Spark Chaser
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You can splice # 6 wire - Use an outdoor weatherproof junction box -split bolt connectors to splice with - Make sure the box is large enough - Make sure you carry the ground through as well. - I assume thats its 240 Volt. Make sure that you tape the joint well - Use Scotch 33+ tape - Don't use the el cheapo tape that you can buy 10 rolls for a dollar - Always use quality stuff when work with electricity - You will live longer.
 
  #4  
Old 06-29-04, 05:30 AM
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Not much else to add here.

1) You must not pull splices into conduit. The splice must be in an accessible junction box, and the junction box must be large enough to contain the splices. You may have to replace your current outlet box with a larger junction box.

2) The correct device for splicing wire of this size is a 'split bolt' connector. This is a combination of nut and bolt where the threaded section of the bolt has a slot cut in it, with various sliding bits. You put your two wires into the slot separated by the sliding bits, and then you tighten down the nut. You have to be careful to select the proper sized connector for the wires that you are going to use.

3) If you use a split bolt, then you will have to insulate it. I do not like ordinary electrical tape for insulating split lugs. Instead I use 'self vulcanizing' rubber tape. This stuff is soft, sticky, and thick. It comes on a roll with a liner, and as you apply the tape you remove the liner. The stuff sticks to itself and forms a solid rubber mass. You tape over the splice until it is completely covered with several layers of this rubber tape, and then you tape over this with ordinary electrical tape.

-Jon
 
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Old 06-29-04, 07:52 AM
worldly
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Thank you for your reply -

Originally Posted by doingitmyself
<b>disclaimer</b>: I'm not a pro, just offering my thoughts: Please wait for more informed opinions.

1. I don't think (actually, I'm positive) that you cannot run a splice through conduit, since the splice would not be accessible for repair/inspection, etc., and of course, pulling and tugging on a splice that is space-restrictive (inside conduit) would subject those splices to tearing apart.


Is there any reason you could not make the splice inside a j-box, anchored to the deck, for instance, and then run the additional, unspliced, wire through the conduit, which would connect to the j-box?

2. #6 wire is big.

I assume that an entirely new cable run would be cost-prohibitive?

I hope I have helped, somewhat, but you must wait for more informed advice.
This is what I thought. That it would be to big of a splice and probably dangerous to pull through the PVC. The only reason I did not think of using a j-box is because, well I just didn't think of - THANKS.

It's not that running a entirely new cable would be cost prohibitive we just hate wasting resources and I jumped the gun a little and bought the new end run before I thought this through.
 
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Old 06-29-04, 07:54 AM
worldly
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Spark Chaser (great name for this forum),

Thank you for your reply.

Originally Posted by Spark Chaser
You can splice # 6 wire - Use an outdoor weatherproof junction box -split bolt connectors to splice with - Make sure the box is large enough - Make sure you carry the ground through as well. - I assume thats its 240 Volt. Make sure that you tape the joint well - Use Scotch 33+ tape - Don't use the el cheapo tape that you can buy 10 rolls for a dollar - Always use quality stuff when work with electricity - You will live longer.
I was not aware of 'Split Bolt Connectors'. These along with the j-box will be perfect.

Thanks again -
 
  #7  
Old 06-29-04, 07:56 AM
worldly
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Winnie,

Thank you for your reply. You put the icing on the cake but confirming everything. Your 'self-vulcanizing' tape sounds like a good idea. I will look for it this morning.

Originally Posted by winnie
Not much else to add here.

1) You must not pull splices into conduit. The splice must be in an accessible junction box, and the junction box must be large enough to contain the splices. You may have to replace your current outlet box with a larger junction box.

2) The correct device for splicing wire of this size is a 'split bolt' connector. This is a combination of nut and bolt where the threaded section of the bolt has a slot cut in it, with various sliding bits. You put your two wires into the slot separated by the sliding bits, and then you tighten down the nut. You have to be careful to select the proper sized connector for the wires that you are going to use.

3) If you use a split bolt, then you will have to insulate it. I do not like ordinary electrical tape for insulating split lugs. Instead I use 'self vulcanizing' rubber tape. This stuff is soft, sticky, and thick. It comes on a roll with a liner, and as you apply the tape you remove the liner. The stuff sticks to itself and forms a solid rubber mass. You tape over the splice until it is completely covered with several layers of this rubber tape, and then you tape over this with ordinary electrical tape.

-Jon
 
  #8  
Old 06-29-04, 11:44 AM
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I use Scotch 130C linerless splicing tape, topped with Scotch Super88 (cold climate) or Scotch Super33.
 
  #9  
Old 06-29-04, 11:58 AM
mgb
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I wrap a layer of 33+ tape with the sticky side out first, then the rubber tape and top it off with 33 or 88 tape. The first layer wrapped "backwards" makes it a little easier to get to the splice if you need to.
 
  #10  
Old 06-29-04, 01:29 PM
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Polaris connectors are much easier and quicker than split bolts. The are pre-insulated so there is no need to worry about sharp edges and linerless tapes.

http://www.polarisconnectors.com/productoverview.html
 
  #11  
Old 06-30-04, 12:17 PM
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Thats what I get for being out of the industry for a while.
 
  #12  
Old 06-30-04, 07:56 PM
worldly
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PCBoss,

I wish I had seen your reply BEFORE I did this....the split bolts were a real pain in the ass....but we enjoyed the hot tub so it must be right....


Originally Posted by pcboss
Polaris connectors are much easier and quicker than split bolts. The are pre-insulated so there is no need to worry about sharp edges and linerless tapes.

http://www.polarisconnectors.com/productoverview.html
 
  #13  
Old 07-01-04, 05:07 AM
Spark Chaser
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Smile

I suggested split bolts because it only takes wrenches to make the connection - No special crimpers - I have been retired for 7 years and I am sure there are new and better ways - But it worked - Thats what counts -Glad it worked for you.
 
  #14  
Old 07-01-04, 08:54 AM
worldly
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Spark Chaser,

Yes, it worked although it's not pretty. If I had it to do all over I would have wasted the resources and ran new wires the whole new length.

Also, the only 'bolt connectors' I found actyually used screws to old the wires in place not bolts.

Thanks again -

Originally Posted by Spark Chaser
I suggested split bolts because it only takes wrenches to make the connection - No special crimpers - I have been retired for 7 years and I am sure there are new and better ways - But it worked - Thats what counts -Glad it worked for you.
 
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